Press Release

June 18, 2018

Lincoln Center Announces 2018 White Light Festival

Lincoln Center

Lincoln Center Announces 2018 White Light Festival

Festival Features Cross-Cultural Performances Embracing

Individual Contemplation and Communal Artistic Experiences

 

October 16–November 18, 2018

 

Highlights include:

 

    • A fresh and insightfully comic interpretation of Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot from Ireland’s Druid theater company and Tony Award–winning director Garry Hynes

 

    • The White Light Festival return of Sutra, following its sold-out run in 2010, by Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui and featuring ancient martial arts by China’s Shaolin monks

 

    • The New York premiere of Borderline by Company Wang Ramirez, combining hip-hop and contemporary dance forms with aerial movement

 

    • XENOSAkram Khan’s work evoking the shell-shock of a First World War soldier through a combination of classical Indian kathak and contemporary dance, in its U.S. premiere and Khan’s final solo performances in a full-length piece

 

    • The world premiere of Framing Time with pianist Pedja Muzijevic and choreographer/dancer Cesc Gelabert, a meditation on music, light, and movement featuring Morton Feldman’s Triadic Memories

 

    • William Christie and Les Arts Florissants revisit Haydn’s monumental oratorio The Creation; violinist Hilary Hahn plays solo Bach; Takács Quartet celebrates Schubert, and more

 

    • The U.S. premiere of Blak Whyte Gray from East London’s Boy Blue, the group’s first full-length abstract work fusing hip-hop dance with African-inspired grooves and an electronic score

 

  • The U.S. premiere of Kaija Saariaho’s chamber opera Only the Sound Remains, based on two Noh plays as translated by Ezra Pound and directed by Peter Sellars, featuring Philippe Jaroussky and Davóne Tines

 

NEW YORK, NY (June 18, 2018 / Updated September 21, 2018) — Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts announced its 2018 White Light Festival, which will run October 16 through November 18. The multidisciplinary festival will feature events presented in six venues across the city, including world, U.S., and New York premieres. The ninth annual international festival will explore transcendence, interior illumination, and the communal impulse as exhibited through artistic expression across continents and centuries.

 

“Today we are both more connected and less connected than ever before,” said Jane Moss, Ehrenkranz Artistic Director of Lincoln Center. “This year’s White Light Festival offers an array of exemplary cross-cultural performances that explore inner contemplation as well as outward creative expression, offering new, profound communal experiences.”

 

The festival takes its name from a quotation by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt: “I could compare my music to white light, which contains all colors. Only a prism can divide the colors and make them appear; this prism could be the spirit of the listener.”

 

The 2018 White Light Festival opens on Tuesday, October 16 with the return of Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui’s Sutra, which had its U.S. premiere in a sold-out run at the inaugural White Light Festival in 2010. The Belgian choreographer mixes contemporary dance with martial arts in this singular piece featuring warrior monks from China’s Shaolin Temple, a Zen Buddhist enclave devoted to kung fu.

 

In another bold fusion of East and West, British choreographer Akram Khan presents the U.S. premiere of XENOS, which marks his final solo performances as a dancer in a full-length piece. Combining classical Indian kathak and contemporary dance, Khan conjures up the shell-shocked dreams of a colonial soldier in this exploration of identity, personal mythology, and the universal horrors of war.

 

Two more groundbreaking works bring contemporary dance to the stages of White Light. Cutting-edge Company Wang Ramirezbased in the South of France, presents the New York premiere of Borderline in which dancers, attached to cables, bring to light and transpose the desire of freedom inherent in all forms of dance to create a visual poetry of gravity and weightlessness. East London’s Boy Blue, founded by Michael “Mikey J” Asante and Kenrick “H2O” Sandy, epitomizes physical virtuosity with a fierce political bite in the U.S. premiere of the dance-theater work Blak Whyte Gray.

 

Ireland’s inestimable Druid theater company and Tony Award–winning director Garry Hynes present Samuel Beckett’s irreverent existentialist masterpiece,Waiting for Godot. In this refreshing reimagining infused with slapstick comedy, Druid’s award-winning production joins the festival for a 14-performance run.

 

Framing Time combines music, movement, and light in a performance of Morton Feldman’s piano workTriadic Memories. For this world premiere production, co-presented with Baryshnikov Arts Center, pianist Pedja Muzijevic performs Feldman’s spare, poetic piece alongside captivating movement from Spanish choreographer and dancer Cesc Gelabert.

 

The human voice steps into the light in a concert version of The Creation, Haydn’s triumphal oratorio depicting the birth of the universe, presented by Les Arts Florissants under William Christie with a trio of archangel soloists. In a more intimate a cappella offering, the Latvian Radio Choir pairs transcendent Mahler with contemporary Latvian composers at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin.

 

Violinist Hilary Hahn revisits Bach’s captivating sonatas and partitas in a solo recital at Alice Tully Hall, and the Takács Quartet appears with new violinist Harumi Rhodes in a sublime exploration of Schubert, joined by cellist David Requiro.

 

The festival closes with the U.S. premiere of Kaija Saariaho’s chamber opera Only the Sound Remains, directed by Peter Sellars. Based on two Noh plays, the hypnotic work creates a shimmering world of supernatural encounters, given voice by countertenor Philippe Jaroussky and bass-baritone Davóne Tines, and embodied by dancer Nora Kimball-Mentzos.

 

As in prior years, the 2018 White Light Festival will offer opportunities for audiences to delve further into the themes of the festival with pre- and post-performance artist talks, film screenings, and a special panel discussion moderated by John Schaefer. White Light Lounges follow many performances: these receptions are exclusive to White Light Festival ticketholders and provide opportunities to mingle with artists and fellow concertgoers while enjoying a complimentary glass of wine or sparkling water.

 

The White Light Festival is one of many programs offered by Lincoln Center that annually activates the campus’s indoor and outdoor spaces across a wide range of the performing arts. Additional presentations include the Mostly Mozart Festival, American Songbook, Midsummer Night Swing, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, ongoing free performances at the David Rubenstein Atrium, and Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts that reach beyond the iconic campus. Lincoln Center also presents a myriad of education programs and presentations for families throughout the year. LincolnCenter.org.

 

Tickets for the 2018 White Light Festival are available online at WhiteLightFestival.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the David Geffen or Alice Tully Hall Box Office (Broadway and 65th Street).

 

* * *

 

White Light Festival 2018

Programs listed in chronological order

Bios of artists are available at the Lincoln Center press site, here.

 

Sutra

Tuesday–Thursday, October 1618 at 7:30 pm

Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui/Sadler’s Wells London

Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, director and choreographer

Antony Gormley, visual design

Szymon Brzóska, music

with monks from the Shaolin Temple

 

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

 

Belgian choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui returns in the Sadler’s Wells production of his acclaimed dance work Sutra, an East-West collaboration with warrior monks from China’s Shaolin Temple that had its U.S. premiere in three sold-out performances at the inaugural White Light Festival in 2010. To develop the piece, Cherkaoui spent several months at the original Shaolin Temple in China’s Henan Province, exploring the monks’ Zen Buddhist practice and devotion to kung fu. The production blends gravity-defying martial arts with contemporary dance and features 17 Shaolin monks; a striking, ever-changing set of 21 wooden boxes created by British sculptor and Cherkaoui’s frequent collaborator Antony Gormley; and a live score by Polish composer Szymon Brzóska. Sutra continues to tour the globe following its world premiere at Sadler’s Wells, London, in May 2008.

 

A Sadler’s Wells London Production, co-produced with Athens Festival, Festival de Barcelona Grec, Grand Théâtre de Luxembourg, La Monnaie Brussels, Festival d’Avignon, Fondazione Musica per Roma, and Shaolin Cultural Communications Company

 

Sutra is made possible in part by The Joelson Foundation and The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

 

Endowment support for the White Light Festival presentation of Sutra is provided by Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

White Light on Film: Silent Light

Wednesday, October 17 at 7:30 pm

Carlos Reygadas, director

(2007) 127 minutes

In 35mm

 

Walter Reade Theater

 

Winner of the Jury Prize at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, celebrated filmmaker Carlos Reygadas's subtly wrought masterpiece tells the story of a married Mennonite man living in an isolated, conservative community who falls in love with another woman. Filmed in Plautdietsch, the low German dialect of Mennonites, it explores the dramatic tension between shared moral values and individual fulfillment.

 

In Plautdietsch with English subtitles

 

Takács Quartet

Thursday, October 18 at 7:30 pm

Takács Quartet

David Requiro, guest cello

Webern: Langsamer Satz

Schubert: String Quintet in C major, D. 956

 

Alice Tully Hall

A White Light Lounge follows this performance

 

Widely considered one of the world’s finest string quartets, the Takács Quartet celebrates Schubert in its first Lincoln Center appearance with new violinist Harumi Rhodes. The quartet is joined by cellist David Requiro in a sublime exploration of Schubert’s revelatory “Cello Quintet.”

 

There will be a pre-concert lecture by Boston University music professor Andrew Shenton at 6:15 pm in the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse.

 

This performance is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

White Light on Film: Ordet ("The Word")

Thursday, October 18 at 7:30 pm

Carl Theodor Dreyer, director

(1955) 126 minutes

 

Walter Reade Theater

 

In this mid-century masterpiece by one of the most influential directors in the history of cinema, Carl Theodor Dreyer offers a transcendent portrait of a farmer's family being torn apart by faith, sanctity, and love. Challenging simple facts and dogmatic orthodoxy, Dreyer's visionary filmmaking layers multiple stories of faith and rebellion, quietly building to a shattering, miraculous climax that feels both immediate and eternal.

 

In Danish with English subtitles

 

Borderline (New York premiere)

FridaySaturday, October 1920 at 7:30 pm

Company Wang Ramirez

Honji Wang and Sébastien Ramirez, artistic direction and choreography

Louis Becker, Johanna Faye, Saïdo Lehlouh, Alister Mazzotti, Sébastien Ramirez, Honji Wang, performers

Jason Oettlé and Kai Gaedtke, rigging development

LACRYMOBOY, music composition

Cyril Mulon, lighting design

Paul Bauer, set design

Catherine Umbdenstock, dramaturgical collaboration

Anna Ramirez, costume realization

 

Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

 

Company Wang Ramirez is a France-based cutting-edge choreographic company crafting a new dance language for the 21st century. In Borderline, the body becomes the object of balance and freedom, as five dancers, often attached to cables, explore the liberating aspects of multiple dance forms, including contemporary dance, hip-hop dance, and aerial movement. With gestures and costumes reflecting images from Greek and Korean traditions, Borderline explores shifting international and personal boundaries, the visual poetry of gravity and weightlessness, and our multicultural urban universe. Borderline had its world premiere at Théâtre de l'Archipel in Perpignan, France, in 2013, and includes original music by France’s LACRYMOBOY. The production receives its New York premiere at the White Light Festival.

 

There will be a post-performance discussion with Honji Wang, Sébastien Ramirez, and Stanford Makishi on Friday, October 19.

 

Borderline is made possible in part by The Joelson Foundation and The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

 

Endowment support for the White Light Festival presentation of Borderline is provided by Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

Hilary Hahn

Tuesday, October 23 at 7:30 pm

Hilary Hahn, solo violin

All-Bach program

Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001

Partita No. 1 in B minor, BWV 1002

Partita No. 2 in D minor, BWV 1004

 

Alice Tully Hall

A White Light Lounge follows this performance

 

In her first White Light Festival appearance, violin luminary Hilary Hahn offers insightful interpretations of Bach’s sonatas and partitas, the singular works that launched her Grammy-winning recording career. For this solo recital, Hahn explores the labyrinthine beauty of J.S. Bach in the minor keys, expanding upon selections from her acclaimed debut recording, Hilary Hahn Plays Bach.

 

This performance is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

White Light Conversation

Saturday, October 27 at 3:00 pm

Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse

A free panel discussion moderated by John Schaefer

Panelists include:

Marc J. Dunkelman, author, The Vanishing Neighbor: The Transformation of American Community

Caterina Fake, co-founder of Flickr

Akram Khan, dancer and choreographer

John J. Thatamanil, theologian

 

Communities are essential building blocks of society. The communities to which we belong, by circumstance or by choice, define both who we are and who we are not. In recent times, major shifts in the concept of community have forced us to question our long-held notions of identity and examine how it shapes our worldview. Join WNYC’s John Schaefer and a group of leading thinkers from such fields as technology, religion, and the arts for a lively discussion of the origins of community and its rapid evolution in the 21st century.

 

XENOS (U.S. premiere)

Wednesday–Thursday, October 31–November 1 at 7:30 pm

Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer

Ruth Little, dramaturg

Michael Hulls, lighting design

Vincenzo Lamagna, composer

Mirella Weingarten, set design

Kimie Nakano, costume design

Jordan Tannahill, writer

Nina Harries, BC Manjunath, Tamar Osborn, Aditya Prakash, Clarice Rarity, musicians

 

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

 

Choreographer and performer Akram Khan returns to the White Light Festival with the U.S. premiere of XENOS, which marks his final solo performances as a dancer in a full-length piece. Meaning “stranger” or “foreigner,” XENOS conjures up the shell-shocked dreams of a colonial soldier in the First World War. Combining classical Indian kathak and contemporary dance, Khan grapples with personal mythology, otherness, and the lucid reality of a world set aflame. XENOS had its world premiere on February 21, 2018, at the Onassis Cultural Centre in Athens. Khan performed his acclaimed solo DESH at the White Light Festival in 2013, and his company presented Vertical Road at the White Light Festival in 2012.

 

Commissioned by 14-18 NOW: WW1 Centenary Art Commissions, supported by the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund and Arts Council England, and by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport


A co-production of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York; Onassis Cultural Centre – A co-production of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York; Onassis Cultural Centre – Athens, The Grange Festival Hampshire, Sadler’s Wells London, New Vision Arts Festival Hong Kong, The´a^tre de la Ville Paris, Les The´a^tres de la Ville de Luxembourg, National Arts Centre Ottawa, The 20th China Shanghai International Arts Festival (CSIAF), Centro Cultural de Bele´m, Festspielhaus St. Po¨lten, Grec 2018 Festival de Barcelona, HELLERAU  European Center for the Arts Dresden, Tanz Ko¨ln, Edinburgh International Festival, Adelaide Festival, Festival Montpellier Danse 2018, Julidans Amsterdam, Canadian Stage Toronto, Romaeuropa Festival, Torinodanza festival / Teatro Stabile di Torino - Teatro Nazionale, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts New York, University of California Berkeley, Danse Danse Montreal, Curve Leicester.


Sponsored by COLAS

 

Xenos is made possible in part by The Joelson Foundation and The Harkness Foundation for Dance. Endowment support for the White Light Festival presentation of Xenos is provided by Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

Framing Time (World premiere)

Thursday–Friday, November 1–2 at 8:00 pm

Cesc Gelabert, choreographer and performer

Pedja Muzijevic, piano

Morton Feldman, composer

Burke Brown, set and lighting design

Lydia Azzopardi, costume design

Feldman: Triadic Memories for piano solo (1981)

 

Baryshnikov Arts Center, Jerome Robbins Theater

A White Light Lounge follows the Friday performance

 

Framing Time is a quietly thrilling meditation on music, light, and movement centered on Morton Feldman’s 1981 solo piano piece, Triadic Memories. For this world premiere production at Baryshnikov Arts Center, Feldman’s spare, mystical piano piece—a work the composer described as the “biggest butterfly in captivity”—merges with an intricate color and light interplay, joined by dance and sculptural elements. Vividly rendered by pianist Pedja Muzijevic, the shifting colors and elastic tempos of Feldman’s painterly music are transformed into acute, poetic movement by Spanish choreographer and dancer Cesc Gelabert, with set and lighting design by Burke Brown.

 

Co-presented by Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival and Baryshnikov Arts Center

 

Waiting for Godot

Friday, November 2 at 7:30 pm

SaturdaySunday, November 34 at 2:00 pm and 7:30 pm

MondayTuesday, November 56 at 7:30 pm

ThursdayFriday, November 89 at 7:30 pm

Saturday, November 10 at 2:00 pm and 7:30 pm

Sunday, November 11 at 2:00 pm

MondayTuesday, November 1213 at 7:30 pm

By Samuel Beckett

Directed by Garry Hynes

Produced by Druid

Starring Garrett Lombard, Aaron Monaghan, Rory Nolan, and Marty Rea, with Nathan Reid and Jaden Pace

Francis O’Connor, set and costume design

James F. Ingalls, lighting design

Greg Clarke, sound design

Nick Winston, movement director

 

Performance length: 2 hours and 30 minutes, including intermission

 

Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

 

Ireland’s incomparable Druid theater company presents Samuel Beckett’s irreverent masterpiece, Waiting for Godot. Existential ennui meets startling slapstick comedy in this refreshing reimagining by Tony Award–winning director Garry Hynes. Druid’s interpretation of Beckett’s iconic play premiered in the 2016 Galway International Arts Festival and has since won acclaim from audiences and critics worldwide, as well as multiple Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards. This production is Druid’s first White Light Festival engagement; Druid last appeared at Lincoln Center with DruidShakespeare at Lincoln Center Festival in 2015.

 

There will be a pre-performance discussion with director Garry Hynes and Robert Marx on Saturday, November 3 at 6:15 pm.

 

Waiting for Godot is made possible in part by Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater.

 

Druid gratefully acknowledges the support of The Arts Council of Ireland and Culture Ireland.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

Latvian Radio Choir

Tuesday, November 13 at 7:30 pm 

Latvian Radio Choir

Sigvards Klava, conductor

Eriks Ešenvalds: Stars

Mahler (arr. Clytus Gottwald): Die zwei blauen Augen

Santa Ratniece: Chu Dal (“Quiet water”)

Mahler (arr. Clytus Gottwald): Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen

Valentin Silvestrov: Diptych

Juris Karlsons: Oremus (World premiere)

Mahler (arr. Gérard Pesson): Adagietto

Eriks Ešenvalds: A Drop in the Ocean

 

Church of St. Mary the Virgin (145 West 46th Street, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues)

A White Light Lounge follows this performance

 

Known around the world for its miraculous sound and imaginative programs, the Latvian Radio Choir returns to the White Light Festival for a luminous evening of a cappella music at the Church of St. Mary the Virgin. Pairing transcendent Mahler with contemporary Latvian composers—including a world premiere by Juris Karlsons—and a beautiful meditation by visionary Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov, the choir moves seamlessly between Latvian, Old Slavonic, Tibetan, German, and English texts to illuminate a universal yearning for inner peace. The Latvian Radio Choir and artistic director Sigvards Klava made their U.S. debuts at the White Light Festival in 2012.

 

The Creation

Thursday, November 15 at 7:30 pm   

Les Arts Florissants

William Christie, conductor

Sandrine Piau, soprano

Hugo Hymas, tenor

Alex Rosen, bass

Haydn:  Die Schöpfung (“The Creation”)

Sung in German with English supertitles

 

Performance length: 2 hours and 10 minutes, including intermission

 

Alice Tully Hall

A White Light Lounge follows this performance

 

Baroque music exponent William Christie, founder of the exceptional period-instrument orchestra and choir Les Arts Florissants, is no less a master of Viennese Classicism. The superlative ensemble and its esteemed director return to the White Light Festival with Haydn’s Creation, the triumphal oratorio featuring a trio of archangel soloists and a chorus of jubilant angels. Using text from the Bible and Milton’s Paradise Lost, Haydn brilliantly depicts the birth of the universe through the emergence of stormy seas, radiant sky, sprightly fauna, and awestruck humanity. Christie and Les Arts Florissants released a two-disc recording of Haydn’s Die Schöpfung on Virgin Classics in 2007. Les Arts Florissants presented a highly praised interpretation of Handel’s Theodora in the 2015 White Light Festival and performed Charpentier motets in the 2012 White Light Festival.

 

There will be a pre-concert lecture by Benjamin D. Sosland, founding director of Juilliard Historical Performance, at 6:15 pm in the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse.

 

This performance is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

 

Blak Whyte Gray (U.S. premiere)

Friday–Saturday, November 16–17 at 7:30 pm

Boy Blue

Michael “Mikey J” Asante, creative direction and music

Kenrick “H2O” Sandy, choreography

Lee Curran, lighting design

Ryan Dawson Laight, costume design

 

Performance length: 90 minutes, including intermission

 

Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

 

Olivier Award–winning East London company Boy Blue brings the electrifying dance-theater work Blak Whyte Gray to Lincoln Center for its U.S. premiere. Driven by founders Michael “Mikey J” Asante and Kenrick “H2O” Sandy, Boy Blue infuses hip-hop dance with African-inspired grooves to create performances pulsing with physical virtuosity. For Blak Whyte Gray (2017), Boy Blue’s first full-length abstract piece, a charged electronic score, bold staging, and powerful imagery call forth a deeply rooted cultural awakening on themes of oppression, identity, and transcendence. The critically acclaimed Blak Whyte Gray was nominated for Best New Dance Production at the 2017 Olivier Awards and for Best Modern Choreography in the 2017 Critics’ Circle National Dance Awards.

 

There will be a post-performance discussion with Michael “Mikey J” Asante and Kenrick “H2O” Sandy on Friday, November 16.

 

Blak Whyte Gray is made possible in part by The Joelson Foundation and The Harkness Foundation for Dance.

 

Endowment support for the White Light Festival presentation of Blak Whyte Gray is provided by Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

Co-commissioned and co-produced by the Barbican

 

Only the Sound Remains (U.S. premiere)

Saturday, November 17 at 7:30 pm

Sunday, November 18 at 5:00 pm

Kaija Saariaho, composer

Peter Sellars, director

Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor

Davóne Tines, bass-baritone

Nora Kimball-Mentzos, dancer and choreographer

Ernest Martínez Izquierdo, conductor

Theatre of Voices

Meta4

Eija Kankaanranta, kantele; Camilla Hoitenga, flute; Heikki Parviainen, percussion

Julie Mehretu, set design

Robby Duiveman, costume design

James F. Ingalls, lighting design

Christophe Lebreton, sound design

Sung in English with supertitles

 

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

 

In Kaija Saariaho’s hypnotic chamber opera Only the Sound Remains, based on Ezra Pound’s translations of two Noh plays, a ghost and an angel emerge from a world of light and shadow. Countertenor Philippe Jaroussky gives voice to these supernatural hosts and bass-baritone Davóne Tines embodies their mortal counterparts in this U.S. premiere directed by Peter Sellars. Transformed by the visionary artwork of artist and MacArthur Fellowship recipient Julie Mehretu, this world reverberates and shimmers with spectral power and features a celestial dance by Nora Kimball-Mentzos. Only the Sound Remains received its world premiere at the Dutch National Opera in March 2016.

 

There will be a pre-performance discussion with Kaija Saariaho, Peter Sellars, and Ara Guzelimian on Sunday, November 18 at 3:45 pm in the Agnes Varis and Karl Leichtman Studio.

 

A co-production of Dutch National Opera, Amsterdam, Finnish National Opera, Opera National de Paris, Teatro Real, and Canadian Opera Company. As one of the original co-commissioners of Kaija Saariaho’s Only the Sound Remains, the Canadian Opera Company is proud to support the North American premiere of this work at Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival.

 

* * *

 

The White Light Festival is a presentation of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (LCPA) serves three primary roles: presenter of artistic programming, national leader in arts and education and community engagement, and manager of the Lincoln Center campus. A presenter of more than 3,000 free and ticketed events, performances, tours, and educational activities annually, LCPA offers a variety of festivals and programs, including American Songbook, Avery Fisher Career Grants and Artist program, David Rubenstein Atrium programming, Great Performers, Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Awards, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project, LC Kids, Midsummer Night Swing, Mostly Mozart Festival, White Light Festival, the Emmy Award–winning Live From Lincoln Center, which airs nationally on PBS, and Lincoln Center Education, which is celebrating more than four decades enriching the lives of students, educators, and lifelong learners. As manager of the Lincoln Center campus, LCPA provides support and services for the Lincoln Center complex and the 11 resident organizations: The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Film Society of Lincoln Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Juilliard School, Lincoln Center Theater, The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Ballet, New York Philharmonic, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, School of American Ballet, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Lincoln Center has become a leading force in using new media and technology to reach and inspire a wider and global audience. Reaching audiences where they are—physically and digitally—has become a cornerstone of making the performing arts more accessible to New Yorkers and beyond. For more information, visit LincolnCenter.org.

 

Lincoln Center is committed to providing and improving accessibility for people with disabilities. For information, contact Accessibility at Lincoln Center at [email protected] or 212.875.5375.

 

***

 

The White Light Festival 2018 is made possible by The Shubert Foundation, The Katzenberger Foundation, Inc., Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater, The Joelson Foundation, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, Great Performers Circle, Chairman’s Council, and Friends of Lincoln Center.

 

Public Support is provided by New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 

Nespresso is the Official Coffee of Lincoln Center.

 

NewYork-Presbyterian is the Official Hospital of Lincoln Center.

 

 

***

 

Follow Lincoln Center on Social Media:

Instagram: @LincolnCenter #WhiteLightFestival

Facebook: facebook.com/LincolnCenterNYC

Twitter: @LincolnCenter #WhiteLightFestival

 

###

 

For more information, please contact:

 

Michelle Tabnick

[email protected]

646-765-4773

 

Pamela Hernández

[email protected]

212.875.5363

High Resolution Images Return to Top

Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer
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Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer
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Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer
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Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer
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Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer
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Akram Khan, director, choreographer, and performer
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David Requiro
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Size: 3600x2880
BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: Frank Szafinski
Size: 3600x2880
BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: Frank Szafinski
Size: 3447x2700
BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: Frank Szafinski
Size: 4508x3000
Louis Becker, performer
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © Fra¨ulein Fabelhaft Ku¨hn
Size: 4016x6016
Johanna Faye, performer
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © Belekfire
Size: 1200x1802
LACRYMOBOY, music composition
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © jfi
Size: 2521x3360
LACRYMOBOY, music composition
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © Norbert Fournier
Size: 2592x2592
Saido Lehlouh, performer
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © Mehdi Baki
Size: 1559x2118
Alister Mazzotti
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © Gordon Mu¨he
Size: 1350x1651
Cyril Mulon, lighting design
Caption: BORDERLINE
Photo Credit: © Wanjiru Kamuyu
Size: 3200x2400
FRAMING TIME
Caption: Cesc Gelabert, choreographer and performer
Photo Credit: Ramo´n Eguiguren
Size: 1201x1800
FRAMING TIME
Caption: Cesc Gelabert, choreographer and performer
Photo Credit: Ramo´n Eguiguren
Size: 1248x1800
FRAMING TIME
Caption: Cesc Gelabert, choreographer and performer
Photo Credit: Ramo´n Eguiguren
Size: 1202x1800
FRAMING TIME
Caption: Cesc Gelabert, choreographer and performer
Photo Credit: Ramo´n Eguiguren
Size: 1201x1800
Pedja Muzijevic, piano
Caption: FRAMING TIME
Photo Credit: courtesy of the artist
Size: 1800x1202
Pedja Muzijevic, piano
Caption: FRAMING TIME
Photo Credit: Jacob Blickenstaff
Size: 1080x720
Rory Nolan as Pozzo, Garrett Lombard as Lucky, Mary Rea as Vladimir...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3414x2362
Druid's production Images 2017
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Valerie O'Sullivan
Size: 6720x4480
Druid's production Images 2017
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Valerie O'Sullivan
Size: 6720x4480
Rory Nolan as Pozzo in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Druid's production Images 2017
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Valerie O'Sullivan
Size: 6720x4547
Druid's production Images 2017
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Valerie O'Sullivan
Size: 6529x4309
Rory Nolan as Pozzo in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
Druid's production Images 2017
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Valerie O'Sullivan
Size: 6720x4480
Druid's production Images 2017
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Valerie O'Sullivan
Size: 6720x4480
Rory Nolan as Pozzo, Garrett Lombard as Lucky, Mary Rea as Vladimir...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2992x2362
Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Marty Rea as Vladimir, Rory Nolan as Pozzo and Aaron Monaghan...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Marty Rea as Vladimir in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
Garrett Lombard as Lucky, Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3096x2362
Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3149
Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Garrett Lombard as Lucky in
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
C. Conneely as Boy, Marty Rea as Vladimir and Aaron Monaghan...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3414x2362
C. Conneely as Boy, Aaron Monaghan as Estragon and Marty Rea...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Aaron Monaghan as Estragon, Garrett Lombard as Lucky and Marty...
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2992x2362
Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3552
Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3307x2362
Aaron Monaghan as Estragon in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
A. Birkett as Boy in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 3456x2362
A. Birkett as Boy in
Caption: Druid’s production of WAITING FOR GODOT by Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes.
Photo Credit: Matthew Thompson
Size: 2362x3307
Greg Clarke, sound design
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: courtesy of the artist
Size: 1200x1800
James F. Ingalls, lighting design
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: courtesy of the artist
Size: 1282x1800
Garrett Lombard
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: Reg Gordon
Size: 2494x3751
Aaron Monaghan
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: Reg Gordon
Size: 2360x3546
Francis O'Connor, set and costume design
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: courtesy of the artist
Size: 1200x1800
Marty Rea
Caption: WAITING FOR GODOT By Samuel Beckett; Directed by Garry Hynes; Produced by Druid.
Photo Credit: Reg Gordon
Size: 2612x3925
Hilary Hahn
Photo Credit: Michael Patrick O'Leary
Size: 725x1500
Hilary Hahn
Photo Credit: Michael Patrick O'Leary
Size: 1513x1500
Hahn_Hilary-05_credit Michael Patrick OLeary
Caption: Hahn_Hilary-05_credit Michael Patrick OLeary
Photo Credit: Michael Patrick OLeary
Size: 1500x1488
Hilary Hahn
Photo Credit: Michael Patrick O'Leary
Size: 1778x1766
Hilary Hahn
Photo Credit: Michael Patrick O'Leary
Size: 1300x1300
Sigvards Klava, conductor; Latvian Radio Choir
Photo Credit: © Ja¯nis Deinats
Size: 3600x2700
Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Albert Vo Van Tao
Size: 3292x2400
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4753x3270
Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor; Nora Kimball-Mentzos, dancer...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4535x3021
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4746x3280
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone; and Nora Kimball-Mentzos, danc...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4821x2994
Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor; and Davóne Tines, bass-ba...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 3113x4788
Ernest Martínez Izquierdo, conductor
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: courtesy of the artist
Size: 3600x2400
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone; and Philippe Jaroussky, counte...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4928x3280
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone; Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4769x2949
Ernest Martínez Izquierdo, conductor
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: courtesy of the artist
Size: 2400x3600
Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor; and Davóne Tines, bass-ba...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4443x3117
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone (in foreground); Philippe Jaroussky...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4080x2675
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone; Philippe Jaroussky, countertenor...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 5048x3360
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4882x3120
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone; and Nora Kimball-Mentzos, da...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4823x3220
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 5282x3216
Davóne Tines, bass-baritone; and Nora Kimball-Mentzos, danc...
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4614x3009
Kaija Saariaho, composer
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: © Maarit Kyto¨haju
Size: 1729x2497
Kaija Saariaho, composer
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: © Priska Ketterer
Size: 1502x2700
Only the sound remains-11_credit Ruth Walz
Caption: Only the sound remains-11_credit Ruth Walz
Photo Credit: Ruth Walz
Size: 4674x3141
Kaija Saariaho, composer
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: © Priska Ketterer
Size: 1800x2699
Kaija Saariaho, composer
Caption: ONLY THE SOUND REMAINS
Photo Credit: © Priska Ketterer
Size: 2400x1598
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Hugo Glendinning
Size: 3600x5410
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Hugo Glendinning
Size: 3743x5400
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Hugo Glendinning
Size: 3600x5410
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 2595x3600
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 2550x3702
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 2400x3933
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 2400x3866
Sutra_ali_0083_credit Andree Lanthier
Caption: Sutra_ali_0083_credit Andree Lanthier
Photo Credit: Andree Lanthier
Size: 3900x2565
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 2538x3600
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 3775x2499
SUTRA
Photo Credit: Andrée Lanthier
Size: 3900x2611

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