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June 13, 2019

Lincoln Center Announces 2019 White Light Festival

Lincoln Center News

Lincoln Center Announces 2019 White Light Festival

 

Festival Marks Tenth Year with Multidisciplinary Works
by Artistic Voices from Across the Globe

 

October 19–November 24, 2019

 

Highlights include:

 

    • The U.S. production premiere of Sugimoto Bunraku Sonezaki Shinju: The Love Suicides at Sonezaki from celebrated artist Hiroshi Sugimoto in a bold, contemporary reinterpretation of the classic Japanese play incorporating bunraku puppet theater, original music, and video

    •  

    • The acclaimed production of DruidShakespeare: Richard III from Ireland’s Druid theater company and Tony Award–winning director Garry Hynes

    •  

    • U.S. premiere of two choral works by Scottish composer James MacMillan that reflect his Catholic faith and Celtic heritage – Stabat Mater performed by Britten Sinfonia and The Sixteen, and the a cappella Miserere

    •  

    • Australia’s Circa ensemble pushes the boundaries of contemporary circus arts in the U.S. premiere of En Masse, featuring Schubert lieder, Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, and music by Swedish composer Klara Lewis

    •  

    • A White Light Festival anniversary presentation of The Manganiyar Seduction, performed by Sufi musicians from Northwest India, which had its U.S. premiere in the inaugural 2010 festival

    •  

    • The New York premiere of the Lincoln Center co-commission Zauberland (Magic Land): An encounter with Schumann’s Dichterliebe, directed by Katie Mitchell, featuring soprano Julia Bullock and pianist Cédric Tiberghien

    •  

    • The Abyssinian Mass by Wynton Marsalis, a joyous, soulful affirmation of the African American experience performed by the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis, and Chorale Le Chateau, presented in collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center

    •  

    • Early music interpreter Jordi Savall directs Hespèrion XXI, La Capella Reial de Catalunya, and guest musicians in Journey to the East, narrated by John Douglas Thompson

    •  

    • Soprano Christine Goerke and tenor Stephen Gould join Gianandrea Noseda and the National Symphony Orchestra for a concert performance of Wagner’s ravishing Tristan und Isolde, Act II

    •  

     

  • Additional highlights include baritone Christian Gerhaher singing Mahler; Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic in Bruckner’s profound Fourth Symphony; Caroline Shaw joined by the Attacca Quartet for a free performance of her works, and more

NEW YORK, NY (June 13, 2019) — Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts today announced its 2019 White Light Festival, which will run October 19 through November 24. For its tenth anniversary season, the multidisciplinary festival will feature events presented in eight venues across the city, including U.S. and New York premieres and the return of festival favorites.

 

“The resonance of the White Light Festival has only deepened during its first decade, as we have moved into far more challenging times here and around the world,” said Jane Moss, Ehrenkranz Artistic Director of Lincoln Center. “The Festival’s central theme, namely the singular capacity of artistic expression to illuminate what is inside ourselves and connect us to others, is more relevant than ever. This 10th anniversary edition spanning disparate countries, cultures, disciplines, and genres emphasizes that the elevation of the spirit the arts inspires uniquely unites us and expands who we are.”

 

The 2019 White Light Festival opens on Saturday, October 19 with Sugimoto Bunraku Sonezaki Shinju: The Love Suicides at Sonezaki told through Japanese bunraku puppet theater in a contemporary interpretation directed by renowned artist Hiroshi Sugimoto. Incorporating music by Seiji Tsurusawa, designated by Japan as a Living National Treasure, and video by Tabaimo and Sugimoto, this U.S. production premiere is a bold staging of Chikamatsu Monzaemon’s classic 18th-century drama based upon actual events, and a rare opportunity to experience bunraku in New York City.

 

Australia’s Circa ensemble blurs the boundaries of dance, theater, music, and circus arts in the New York premiere of En Masse, featuring selections from Schubert’s Winterreise and Schwanengesang, plus music by Swedish composer Klara Lewis and a two-piano arrangement of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. Circa returns to the festival following its celebrated U.S. premiere performance of How Like an Angel in 2014.

 

Schumann’s Dichterliebe is at the core of Zauberland (Magic Land), a New York premiere directed by Katie Mitchell, in which the Romantic song cycle is interwoven with 16 new songs by composer Bernard Foccroulle and writer Martin Crimp. Soprano Julia Bullock and pianist Cédric Tiberghien star in this story of a woman from a war-torn land seeking a magical realm of security and peace.

 

The darker side of human nature is on display in DruidShakespeare: Richard III, a chilling story of power and ambition in a wickedly comic production from Ireland’s Druid theater company and director Garry Hynes. The production stars Aaron Monaghan, who appeared as Estragon in Druid’s acclaimed Waiting for Godot in the 2018 White Light Festival.

 

For its anniversary year the festival welcomes back other beloved artists, including early music interpreter Jordi Savall and his ensembles Hespèrion XXI and La Capella Reial de Catalunya, who with international guest musicians trace the epic route of Francis Xavier’s Journey to the East. Tony Award nominee John Douglas Thompson returns to narrate the story of the 16th-century Jesuit missionary’s travels from Lisbon to Mozambique, India, Malaysia, Japan, and China.

 

Also returning is the rapturous Manganiyar Seduction, a musical dance of delirium performed by Sufi musicians from Northwest India, which first appeared in the White Light Festival’s inaugural 2010 season and returned due to popular demand in 2013. Audiences will be invited to enter another truly unique sound world with the Republic of Georgia’s Ensemble Basiani, a male a cappella chorus performing Georgian folk, work, and sacred songs of haunting, unearthly beauty. Basiani returns to the Church of St. Mary the Virgin after a celebrated festival debut in 2012.

 

Among works that explore religious devotion, Scottish composer James MacMillan’s Stabat Mater makes its U.S. premiere, alongside the U.S. premiere of his a cappella choral work Miserere. Britten Sinfonia joins chorus The Sixteen under Harry Christophers to perform the devastatingly beautiful works created for them that reflect MacMillan’s deep Catholic faith and Celtic heritage.

 

Continuing with soulful devotion and joyous song is The Abyssinian Mass by award-winning composer and trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, which captures the African American experience through a swinging big band and gospel choir celebration named for Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church. Co-presented with Jazz at Lincoln Center, Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra will be joined by Damien Sneed and Chorale Le Chateau.

 

Mortal love pulls at the musical heart strings in Act II of Wagner’s groundbreaking Tristan und Isolde, performed in concert by the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) under Gianandrea Noseda in his first Lincoln Center appearance as NSO music director. Tenor Stephen Gould as Tristan joins soprano Christine Goerke as Isolde for one of the most rapturous and difficult duets in the repertory.

 

The period-instrument ensemble Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and its Choir perform a concert plumbing the depths of human experience in Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater, then rising to soar with Vivaldi’s Gloria. The human voice takes center stage again in an all-Mahler recital from baritone Christian Gerhaher. Pianist Kit Armstrong presents an intimate recital of Bach’s intricate Goldberg Variations, and Pulitzer Prize–winning composer Caroline Shaw joins the Attacca Quartet for a free performance of her works in the David Rubenstein Atrium.

 

The 2019 festival closes with conductor Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic making a festival debut with Bruckner’s Symphony No. 4. The Austrian composer, a devout Catholic, imbued his symphonies with a romanticism that radiates through his most popular orchestral work.

 

As in prior years, the 2019 White Light Festival will offer opportunities for audiences to delve further into the themes of the festival with pre- and post-performance artist talks and a special panel discussion moderated by John Schaefer. White Light Lounges follow many performances: these receptions are exclusive to White Light Festival ticketholders and provide opportunities to mingle with artists and fellow concertgoers while enjoying a complimentary glass of wine or sparkling water. 

 

Tickets for the 2019 White Light Festival will be available online at WhiteLightFestival.org, by calling CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or at the David Geffen or Alice Tully Hall Box Office (Broadway and 65th Street). Single tickets will be available to purchase beginning June 25, 2019.  Friends of Lincoln Center get presale access to tickets beginning June 20, 2019. Visit Support.LincolnCenter.org to become a member for presale access.

 

The White Light Festival is one of many programs offered by Lincoln Center that annually activates the campus’s indoor and outdoor spaces across a wide range of the performing arts. Additional presentations include the Mostly Mozart Festival, Great Performers, American Songbook, Midsummer Night Swing, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, ongoing free performances at the David Rubenstein Atrium, and Live From Lincoln Center broadcasts that reach beyond the iconic campus. Lincoln Center also presents a myriad of education programs and presentations for families throughout the year.

 

Please click here to download high-resolution images and artist biographies. 

 

 

White Light Festival 2019 

Programs listed in chronological order 

 

Sugimoto Bunraku Sonezaki Shinju: The Love Suicides at Sonezaki (U.S. production premiere)

Saturday, October 19, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                                 

Sunday, October 20, 2019 at 3:00 pm

Monday, October 21, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Tuesday, October 22, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

 

Original text by Chikamatsu Monzaemon
Hiroshi Sugimoto, artistic director
Seiji Tsurusawa, composer and director

Tomogoro Yamamura, choreography
Tabaimo and Hiroshi Sugimoto, video

Cast: Rodayu Toyotake, Seiji Tsurusawa, Tamasuke Yoshida, and others

Performed in Japanese with English supertitles

 

Performance length: Two hours and 30 minutes, including intermission

 

At the turn of 18th-century Japan, a clerk and a courtesan committed suicide in the forest of Tenjin. The Love Suicides at Sonezaki, a tragic play based upon these actual events, was banned after its 1703 premiere for more than two centuries. For this U.S. production premiere, renowned artist Hiroshi Sugimoto presents a bold, contemporary interpretation of the classic drama using bunraku puppet theater with music by Seiji Tsurusawa, who has been designated by Japan as a Living National Treasure, and video by Tabaimo and Sugimoto. The puppets, imbued with life, captivate audiences with their lively movements rivaling the eloquence of actual human beings.

 

Presented in association with The Japan Foundation and Odawara Art Foundation. Sugimoto Bunraku Sonezaki Shinju: The Love Suicides at Sonezaki is part of Japan 2019, a series of events highlighting Japanese arts and culture in the United States throughout 2019.  

 

Corporate support is provided by Mitsui & Co. (U.S.A.), Inc., Mitsubishi Corporation (Americas), J.C.C. Fund, Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of New York, and Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal U.S.A., Inc.

 

Additional support is made possible in part by The Jim Henson Foundation.

 

En Masse (U.S. premiere)

Wednesday, October 23, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                              

Thursday, October 24, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Friday, October 25, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

 

Circa

Created by Yaron Lifschitz with the Circa Ensemble

Music by Franz Schubert, Klara Lewis, and Igor Stravinsky
Yaron Lifschitz, direction and stage design
Yaron Lifschitz and Richard Clarke, lighting design
Libby McDonnell, associate director and costume design

 

Performance length: One hour and 50 minutes, including intermission

Australia’s Circa ensemble embodies electrifying explosions of physicality and power in this work that blurs the boundaries of dance, theater, music, and circus arts. Under the visionary direction of Yaron Lifschitz, the troupe melds circus acrobatics with contemporary dance in the tender and savage En Masse, featuring ten acrobats and three musicians performing to music by Swedish composer Klara Lewis interspersed with selections from Schubert’s haunting Winterreise and Schwanengesang. A two-piano arrangement of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring yields the anarchic energy of acrobats caught in a life-and-death struggle. Circa appeared in the U.S. premiere of How Like an Angel in the 2014 White Light Festival.

 

There will be a post-performance discussion with Libby McDonnell and Elizabeth Streb on Thursday, October 24.

 

Endowment support for the White Light Festival presentation of En Masse is provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance.

 

 

Journey to the East

Thursday, October 24, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                                 

Alice Tully Hall

 

Jordi Savall, director

John Douglas Thompson, narrator

La Capella Reial de Catalunya

Hespèrion XXI

(Japan) Junko Ueda, voice and biwa; Ichiro Seki, shakuhachi; Masako Hirao, bass viol; Hiroyuki Koinuma, shinobue and nokan

(India) Prabhu Edouard, tablas 

(Afghanistan) Daud Sadozai, sarod

Sung in Spanish, German, Latin, Provençal, Japanese, and Chinese with English supertitles

 

Performance length: Two hours, including intermission

 

Journey to the East links two unique figures across the centuries: acclaimed early-music interpreter Jordi Savall and St. Francis Xavier, the 16th-century Jesuit missionary who traveled from the court of Lisbon to Mozambique, India, Malaysia, Japan, and China. In this epic musical journey, narrated by John Douglas Thompson, Savall directs Hespèrion XXI, La Capella Reial de Catalunya, and guest musicians as they trace the rich array of percussion, melodic instruments, and vocal styles Francis Xavier would have encountered on his route. Journey to the East is based on Savall’s 2008 album Francis Xavier: The Route to the Orient, created from a program marking the 500th anniversary of Xavier’s birth. Savall returns to the White Light Festival following presentations of The Cycles of Life: A Musical Exploration of the Balkans in 2013 and The Routes of Slavery, also narrated by Thompson, in 2017.

 

There will be a pre-concert discussion with Jordi Savall and Ara Guzelimian at 6:15 pm.

 

Mahler Songs

Tuesday, October 29, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Alice Tully Hall

                                                                                                                                                           

Christian Gerhaher, baritone

Gerold Huber, piano

All-Mahler program

Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen

Songs from Des Knaben Wunderhorn

Kindertotenlieder

 

Baritone Christian Gerhaher and pianist Gerold Huber have a 30-year partnership that began in their schooldays. Since then, the pair have devoted themselves to lied interpretation through performances, recordings and by teaching. This lyrical evening moves from the disenchanted wanderer of Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (“Songs of a Wayfarer”) to selected folkloric poetry settings of Des Knaben Wunderhorn (“The Boy’s Magic Horn”), concluding with the eternally poignant Kindertotenlieder. Together, Gerhaher and Huber have recorded the Schubert, Schumann, and Mahler cycles for Sony Music, as well as a new recording of Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin that was released in autumn 2017. The duo’s third Schumann CD, also including the Kerner Songs, was released in autumn 2018. Gerhaher portrayed Jesus in Peter Sellars’s much-acclaimed St. Matthew Passion featured in the 2014 White Light Festival.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

Zauberland (Magic Land): An encounter with Schumann’s Dichterliebe (New York premiere)

Tuesday, October 29, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                                  

Wednesday, October 30, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

 

Julia Bullock, soprano

Cédric Tiberghien, piano

With Ben Clifford, Natasha Kafka, David Rawlins, Raphael Zari

Music by Robert Schumann and Bernard Foccroulle

Text by Heinrich Heine and Martin Crimp

Katie Mitchell, stage direction

Chloe Lamford, set and costume design

James Farncombe, lighting design

Performed in German and English with English supertitles

 

Performance length: 80 minutes, no intermission

 

Katie Mitchell directs Zauberland (Magic Land), a New York premiere starring soprano Julia Bullock and pianist Cédric Tiberghien. As violence blazes, a young woman waits at the border of Zauberland—a magical world of security and peace. But while asleep, her dreams are haunted by images of the burnt-out city she was forced to abandon. Composer Bernard Foccroulle and writer Martin Crimp interweave 16 new songs with Schumann’s Dichterliebe, a Romantic song cycle infused with yearning and fairy-tale landscapes. A co-commission of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and the Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord, Zauberland premiered at Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord on April 5, 2019. Katie Mitchell directed T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets at the 2011 White Light Festival.

 

There will be a post-performance discussion with Julia Bullock and Cédric Tiberghien, moderated by Ara Guzelimian, on Wednesday, October 30.

 

A production of C.I.C.T. — Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord

A co-production of Royal Opera House, London; La Monnaie/De Munt, Brussels; Opéra de Lille; Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Inc., New York; Opéra de Rouen Normandie; University Musical Society of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Le cercle des partenaires des Bouffes du Nord.

With the support from Lyrical Creation Fund (SACD)
Co-commissioned by the Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord and the co-producers

 

The Manganiyar Seduction

Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                            

Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Friday, November 8, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 7:30 pm

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

 

Roysten Abel, concept and director

Deu Khan, conductor

With Manganiyar musicians

 

Performance length: 75 minutes, no intermission

 

The White Light Festival welcomes back The Manganiyar Seduction, the acclaimed music-theater work by Indian director Roysten Abel that had its U.S. premiere at the inaugural festival in 2010 and returned by popular demand in 2013. The Manganiyars, nomadic Sufi Muslims from Northwest India, incorporate Hindu deities into their devotional songs. Conceived by Indian director Roysten Abel, more than 40 musicians, led by Deu Khan, are arranged in four levels of red-curtained, brightly lit boxes in a set inspired by the women’s quarters of Hawa Mahal (a royal palace in Jaipur) and the red-light district of Amsterdam. This seduction of the spirit begins quietly with a solitary desert fiddle and builds to an ecstatic eruption of sound, light, and color as the Manganiyar community takes audiences into and beyond their world.

 

There will be a post-performance discussion with Roysten Abel and John Schaefer on Friday, November 8.

 

DruidShakespeare: Richard III

Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 7:00 pm (preview performance)

Friday, November 8, 2019 at 7:00 pm (preview performance)

Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Sunday, November 10, 2019 at 3:00 pm

Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Thursday, November 14, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Friday, November 15, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 2:00 and 7:00 pm

Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 3:00 pm

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Friday, November 22, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Saturday, November 23, 2019 at 2:00 pm

Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College

 

Directed by Garry Hynes

Produced by Druid

Starring Aaron Monaghan as Richard III

Francis O’Connor, set and costume design

James F. Ingalls, lighting design

Gregory Clarke, sound design

David Bolger, movement and fight choreography

Conor Linehan, music

Doreen McKenna, co-costume design

 

Performance length: Three hours, including intermission

 

Shakespeare depicts one of the world’s greatest villains in Richard III, a chilling and darkly comic story of power and ambition. Richard, Duke of Gloucester, portrayed by Aaron Monaghan, sets about bending the world to his own desires, vanquishing his better angels in pursuit of the crown. The Bard’s ruthless monarch resonates through the ages in this award-winning production from Ireland’s Druid theater company and Tony Award–winning director Garry Hynes. A continuation of the company’s exploration of Shakespeare’s kings, the production reunites the creative team and members of the Druid ensemble behind the celebrated DruidShakespeare: Richard II, Henry IV (Pts. 1 & 2) and Henry V, which played Lincoln Center in 2015. Druid’s acclaimed run of Waiting for Godot, also directed by Hynes and starring Monaghan as Estragon, was featured in the 2018 White Light Festival.

 

There will be a pre-performance discussion with Garry Hynes and Robert Marx on Sunday, November 10 at 1:45 pm in the John Jay College Lecture Hall.

 

DruidShakespeare: Richard III is made possible in part by endowment support from the American Express Cultural Preservation Fund.

 

MacMillan Stabat Mater

Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                               

Alice Tully Hall

 

Britten Sinfonia

The Sixteen, choir

Harry Christophers, conductor

All-James MacMillan program

Miserere (U.S. premiere)

Stabat Mater (U.S. premiere)

 

Performance length: 70 minutes, no intermission

 

Sir James MacMillan, the preeminent Scottish composer of our time, draws upon his Celtic heritage and Catholic faith to compose modern-day sacred works that transcend the concert hall. This all-MacMillan program, performed by the Britten Sinfonia and The Sixteen, under the baton of Harry Christophers, features the U.S. premieres of MacMillan’s haunting Miserere and his monumental new Stabat Mater, a devastating hymn of a mother’s anguish. This Stabat Mater is the first musical work ever to be streamed live from the Sistine Chapel and was released on the Coro label in March 2017. Britten Sinfonia previously performed in the U.S. premiere production of Netia Jones’s Curlew River at the 2014 White Light Festival.

 

There will be a pre-concert talk with James MacMillan and Andrew Shenton at 6:15 p.m. in the Opera Learning Center (Rose building, 6th floor).

 

James MacMillan’s Stabat Mater was commissioned by the Genesis Foundation for Harry Christophers and The Sixteen.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

Kit Armstrong

Sunday, November 10, 2019 at 11:00 am                                                                                               

Walter Reade Theater

 

Kit Armstrong, piano

Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988

 

Bach’s Goldberg Variations are a hypnotic keyboard showpiece of revelatory lyricism and intricacy. The young musical phenomenon Kit Armstrong, protégé of the legendary pianist Alfred Brendel, illuminates the Goldberg Variations in this intimate Sunday morning recital followed by coffee and conversation with the artist and audience. Kit Armstrong Performs Bach’s Goldberg Variations and Its Predecessors was released on DVD by Unitel from his performance at Concertgebouw Amsterdam and was named the December 2017 “Instrumental Choice” by BBC Music Magazine.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

White Light Conversation: Let’s Talk About Religion

Saturday, November 9, 2019 from 3:00 to 4:30 pm                                                                                

Rose Studio, Samuel B. and David Rose Building, 10th Floor

 

John Schaefer, moderator

Marcelo Gleiser, theoretical physicist and astronomer

Rev. Winnie Varghese, priest and director of justice and reconciliation, Trinity Wall Street

James MacMillan, composer

 

God was declared dead in 1966, no longer relevant to an increasingly secular society. Today, people around the world ardently seek religious and faith-based experiences, at times with an intolerant fervor. How did we vacillate between such extremes in the span of only half a century? In modern society, few topics are as subject to ignorance, misunderstanding, and manipulation as religion. Although it is a central building block of human consciousness, we possess surprisingly little knowledge about religious traditions—both of others and our own. Join WNYC’s John Schaefer and a group of leading thinkers for a spirited panel discussion exploring the many contradictions inherent in our understanding of religion and the evolutionary pathways of religious belief, as well as its intersection with science and art and resonance in our current chaotic climate.

 

Ensemble Basiani

Wednesday, November 13, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                          

Church of St. Mary the Virgin (145 West 46th Street, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues)

 

Ensemble Basiani

Traditional a cappella folk, sacred, and work songs from the Republic of Georgia

 

Performance length: 70 minutes, no intermission

 

Performing mesmerizing Georgian choral music from every corner of this ancient, ethnically diverse region, the striking male voices of Ensemble Basiani embody otherworldly sound from the world’s oldest polyphonic tradition. Following a celebrated 2012 White Light Festival appearance, Basiani returns for a transporting a cappella concert of sacred, work, and folk songs in the Church of St. Mary the Virgin. Ensemble Basiani made its U.S. debut at the Mostly Mozart Festival in 2010.

 

Words and Music

Thursday, November 14, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                             

David Rubenstein Atrium

 

Attacca Quartet

Caroline Shaw, voice

All-Caroline Shaw program

Entr’acte

Valencia

Plan and Elevation

Songs for Strings and Voice

 

Pulitzer Prize–winning composer Caroline Shaw uses her distinctive voice to lure audiences into an original sound world of wonder, exploration, and poignancy. For this free concert, Shaw joins the dynamic Attacca Quartet as vocalist in a program featuring the spare and soulful quartet Entr’acte; a hauntingly beautiful collection of songs for strings and voice; and the rousing Valencia, an ode to the beauty of an orange.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

 

Tristan and Isolde, Act II in concert

Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 3:00 pm                                                                                                

David Geffen Hall

 

National Symphony Orchestra

Gianandrea Noseda, conductor

Christine Goerke (Isolde)

Ekaterina Gubanova (Brangäne)

Stephen Gould (Tristan)

Günther Groissböck (King Marke)

Neal Cooper (Melot)

Hunter Enoch (Kurwenal)

Wagner: Tristan und Isolde, Act II

Sung in German with English supertitles

 

Performance length: 80 minutes, no intermission

 

In his inaugural Lincoln Center performance as the National Symphony Orchestra’s music director, Gianandrea Noseda welcomes a host of today’s leading operatic stars for a concert performance of Act II of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. For this performance of Act II, which the composer himself had planned to present in a stand-alone concert, soprano Christine Goerke and tenor Stephen Gould join the esteemed NSO for what is the longest and possibly most intense duet in the repertoire. Stephen Gould, the "go-to” Tristan of our time, is paired with Christine Goerke, known for her exquisite interpretations of Wagner heroines, as Isolde.

 

There will be a pre-concert lecture by dramaturg Cori Ellison at 1:45 p.m. in the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

Gloria

Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 7:30 pm                                                                                             

Alice Tully Hall

 

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

Choir of the Age of Enlightenment

Jonathan Cohen, conductor and harpsichord

Katherine Watson, soprano

Rowan Pierce, soprano

Iestyn Davies, countertenor

Pergolesi: Stabat Mater

Vivaldi: Gloria in D major, RV 589

Sung in Latin with English supertitles

 

Performance length: 90 minutes, including intermission

 

The unparalleled period-instrument Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and its Choir present a stirring program of Baroque masterworks. Featuring British conductor and harpsichordist Jonathan Cohen and radiant vocal soloists, including countertenor Iestyn Davies (Guardian, U.K.), the concert begins with Pergolesi’s exquisite Stabat Mater, a profoundly moving portrait of a mother’s agony resolving in melodic grace. The second half of the program emerges from the depths with Vivaldi’s joyful Gloria, an exuberant hymn of praise.

 

There will be a pre-concert lecture by scholar Benjamin D. Sosland at 6:15 p.m. in the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

The Abyssinian Mass by Wynton Marsalis

Presented in collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center

Thursday, November 21, 2019 at 8:00 pm

Friday, November 22, 2019 at 8:00 pm

Saturday, November 23, 2019 at 8:00 pm

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

 

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, sermon

Chorale Le Chateau

Damien L. Sneed, conductor

Wynton Marsalis: The Abyssinian Mass

 

Performance length: Two hours and 25 minutes, including intermission

 

The African American experience takes center stage in The Abyssinian Mass, a swinging celebration for big band and gospel choir from Grammy- and Pulitzer Prize–winning composer, bandleader, and trumpeter Wynton Marsalis. Created to mark the bicentennial of Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church in 2008, the Mass is a joyous, soulful affirmation of the human spirit. The Abyssinian Mass was released by Blue Engine Records in 2016, following a 16-city tour across the American South. This engagement marks the second White Light Festival appearance for the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra and Wynton Marsalis. They also performed John Coltrane’s A Love Supreme in 2015.

 

Bruckner’s Fourth

Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 3:00 pm                                                                                                

David Geffen Hall

 

Los Angeles Philharmonic

Gustavo Dudamel, conductor

Bruckner: Symphony No. 4 in E-flat major (“Romantic”)

 

To close the White Light Festival, Gustavo Dudamel and the Los Angeles Philharmonic perform devout composer Anton Bruckner’s soaring Symphony No. 4, a mystical masterpiece that remains one of his most popular orchestral works. Frequent guests of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers series, this concert marks the White Light Festival debuts of Dudamel and the L.A. Phil.

 

This concert is also part of Lincoln Center’s Great Performers.

 

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Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (LCPA)?serves three primary roles: presenter of artistic programming, national leader in arts and education and community engagement, and manager of the Lincoln Center campus. A presenter of thousands of free and ticketed events, performances, tours, and educational activities annually, LCPA offers a variety of festivals and programs, including American Songbook, Avery Fisher Career Grants and Artist program, David Rubenstein Atrium programming, Great Performers, Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Awards, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project, LC Kids, Midsummer Night Swing, Mostly Mozart Festival, White Light Festival, the Emmy Award–winning Live From Lincoln Center, which airs nationally on PBS, and Lincoln Center Education, which is celebrating more than four decades enriching the lives of students, educators, and lifelong learners. As manager of the Lincoln Center campus, LCPA provides support and services for the Lincoln Center complex and the 11 resident organizations: The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Film at Lincoln Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Juilliard School, Lincoln Center Theater, The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Ballet, New York Philharmonic, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, School of American Ballet, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. 

 

Lincoln Center is committed to providing and improving accessibility for people with disabilities. For information, contact Accessibility at Lincoln Center at [email protected] or 212.875.5375. 

 

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The White Light Festival 2019 is made possible by The Shubert Foundation, The Katzenberger Foundation, Inc., Mitsui & Co. (U.S.A.), Inc., Mitsubishi Corporation (Americas), Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater, The Joelson Foundation, The Harkness Foundation for Dance, J.C.C. Fund, Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of New York, Great Performers Circle, Lincoln Center Spotlight, Chairman’s Council and Friends of Lincoln Center.

 

Public support is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature

 

NewYork-Presbyterian is the Official Hospital of Lincoln Center

 

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Follow Lincoln Center on Social Media:

Instagram: @LincolnCenter

Facebook: facebook.com/LincolnCenterNYC

Twitter: @LincolnCenter

#WhiteLightFestival

 

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For more information, please contact:

Isabel Sinistore

[email protected]

212-671-4195

 

Jenni Klauder

[email protected]

212-875-5490

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