Press Release

March 12, 2020

Lincoln Center Announces 2020 Mostly Mozart Festival July 14–August 8

Lincoln Center News

Lincoln Center Announces 2020 Mostly Mozart Festival

July 14–August 8

 

Featured Premieres:

 

Three Premieres Focused on Connection and Community

Divine Connection weaves works by Arvo Pärt through Mozart’s Requiem in this Lincoln Center

commission and world premiere staging directed by Elkhanah Pulitzer,

choreographed by Chanel DaSilva

 

The New York City premiere of Blue, a new opera by Jeanine Tesori and Tazewell Thompson,

examines the joys and tragedies of an African American family in Harlem,
augmented by a series of companion events with partners around NYC

 

A world premiere Lincoln Center commission by Jonathan Dove and Alasdair Middleton
entitled Search for Spring, a community-driven choral piece about loss and renewal
for nearly 1,000 voices, staged on Lincoln Center’s outdoor plaza

 

Additional Highlights Include:

 

A recreation of Beethoven’s legendary 1808 Akademie concert with the
Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra and Louis Langrée featuring
the Concert Chorale of New York, the Young People’s Chorus of New York City,
pianist Kirill Gerstein, soprano Susanna Phillips, and additional soloists

 

The New York premiere of Flowers for Kazuo Ohno (and Leonard Cohen)
by Colombian contemporary dance company Compañía Cuerpo de Indias

 

The Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra welcomes acclaimed soloists including Beatrice Rana,

Augustin Hadelich, Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Jeremy Denk, and Steven Isserlis and
guest conductors, Andrew Manze, Richard Egarr, Joshua Weilerstein,
and Venezuelan conductor Rafael Payare in his New York debut

 

Mark Morris Dance Group’s utopian vision of life and art L’Allegro, il Penseroso
ed il Moderato
, set to Handel’s pastoral ode, conducted by Jane Glover

 

International Contemporary Ensemble performs the North American premiere of
Anna Thorvaldsdottir’s UR_ as part of the ensemble’s tenth annual festival residency

 

NEW YORK (March 12, 2020) — Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts today announced its 2020 Mostly Mozart Festival, running from July 14 through August 8. Maintaining Mozart’s innovative spirit as its inspiration, the festival magnifies its impact through groundbreaking immersive works, commissions, premieres, international multidisciplinary productions, and more. Animating Lincoln Center’s iconic campus, the festival will invite audiences to actively participate—whether as audience members, as performers themselves, or in dialogue around specific works of art. American Express is the lead sponsor of the Mostly Mozart Festival.

 

“This summer, more than ever, we embrace the message of aspiration and the expansion of the human spirit that music and the performing arts uniquely provide,” said Jane Moss, Ehrenkranz Artistic Director of Lincoln Center. “Mozart was deeply engaged by the social and political currents of his time, reflected in some of his most sublime and penetrating masterpieces. We, too, engage this summer with the local and global world around us for inspiration and are pleased to offer an ambitious schedule which promises to forge hope, connection, and community with the backing of long-time arts supporter American Express, who shares our passion for cultural preservation and arts advocacy.”

 

The festival presents three premieres that encourage connection and community engagement. It begins with a special opening night presentation of Divine Connection, a Lincoln Center commission and world premiere interweaving Mozart’s Requiem with ethereal music by Arvo Pärt, including his “Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten” and Te Deum. The ambitious staging is directed by Elkhanah Pulitzer and choreographed by Chanel DaSilva. Renée and Robert Belfer Music Director Louis Langrée conducts the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra, four soloists, and The Choir of Trinity Wall Street.

 

The New York City premiere of Blue, a new opera by Jeanine Tesori and Tazewell Thompson, traces the joys and tragedies of an African American couple in Harlem raising their son in 21st-century America, and explores race, violence, and reconciliation. A series of events will be presented in tandem with Blue, to engage a variety of communities around the topics that the opera addresses.

 

The festival culminates in an extraordinary closing day that includes the world premiere of Search for Spring, also part of Lincoln Center Out of Doors. For this Lincoln Center commission, the composer-librettist team Jonathan Dove and Alasdair Middleton enlists a thousand voices of experienced and amateur singers from all across New York City for this massive choral work exploring loss and renewal, staged outdoors on Lincoln Center’s Josie Robertson Plaza. The performance builds on three highly acclaimed outdoor world premieres commissioned previously for the Mostly Mozart Festival: John Luther Adams’s In the Name of the Earth (2018) and Sila: The Breath of the World (2014), and David Lang’s the public domain (2016).

 

Rounding out the final day is an epic Beethoven experience in celebration of the composer’s 250th birth year: a recreation of his 1808 Akademie concert, previously performed at the Mostly Mozart Festival in 2007. Based on the actual event organized and performed by Beethoven himself, the Akademie featured the world premieres of his Fifth and Sixth Symphonies and “Choral Fantasy,” as well as the first public performance of his Fourth Piano Concerto. Balancing out the program was the concert aria “Ah! perfido,” the “Gloria,” “Sanctus,” and “Benedictus” from the Mass in C, and improvisations at the piano by Beethoven himself. Louis Langrée leads the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra on this uplifting humanistic odyssey along with distinguished vocalists, with Kirill Gerstein playing the role of Beethoven the soloist.

 

International multidisciplinary productions have become a hallmark of the Mostly Mozart Festival, and this year is no exception. Mark Morris Dance Group celebrates the company’s 40th anniversary this year, returning to the festival with Morris’s beloved utopian vision of Handel’s ode L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato, based on Milton’s well-known poem. Jane Glover conducts the MMDG Music Ensemble and The Choir of Trinity Wall Street with Downtown Voices. Japanese Butoh founder Kazuo Ohno and beloved Canadian singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen serve as inspiration for the New York premiere of Flowers for Kazuo Ohno (and Leonard Cohen), a spirited homage by Colombian contemporary dance-theater troupe Compañía Cuerpo de Indias.

 

At the core of the festival is the celebrated Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra led by Louis Langrée, offering the works of Mozart and his contemporaries, as well as Baroque repertoire and music of today. In addition to the ensemble’s profound opening and closing night performances, programs this summer span from the First and Second Viennese Schools to the New York premiere of HK Gruber’s Manhattan Broadcasts.

 

Special highlights this summer include: the culmination of Langrée’s four-year cycle of the Brahms Symphonies; a free all-Mozart program in the David Rubenstein Atrium performed by a wind octet from the Festival Orchestra; and Beethoven’s Triple Concerto with the all-star team of Joshua Bell, Steven Isserlis, and Jeremy Denk. The Orchestra also welcomes acclaimed soloists and guest conductors throughout the summer, including Beatrice Rana, Augustin Hadelich, Emanuel Ax, Andrew Manze, Richard Egarr, Joshua Weilerstein, and Venezuelan conductor Rafael Payare in his New York debut. Each orchestral performance is preceded by a pre-concert recital or talk.

 

“We are so excited to open the 2020 Festival with a Lincoln Center commission, interspersing Mozart’s Requiem with Arvo Pärt’s Te Deum—two pieces that elevate us as we contemplate our existence,” said Mostly Mozart Festival Music Director Louis Langrée. “We continue our journey by exploring masterpieces of the First and Second Viennese Schools—from Haydn and Mozart to Berg and Webern, as well as the New York premiere of Manhattan Broadcasts by the contemporary Viennese composer H.K. Gruber. Our four-summer Brahms pilgrimage concludes with his Fourth Symphony and Berg’s Violin Concerto, both of which echo Bach, whose Cantata 150 opens the program. And, our epic finale is a recreation of Beethoven’s Akademie concert of 1808, new works in his time that continue to deliver his humanistic message of fraternity, strength, and beauty. We welcome a spectacular array of artists—old friends and new faces—to join us for this extraordinary voyage.”

 

Iván Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra perform a boisterous concert staging of Verdi’s comic masterpiece, Falstaff, in a U.S. production premiere. Isabelle Faust and Kristian Bezuidenhout join the Freiburg Baroque Orchestra in an all-Beethoven program, and the Danish String Quartet brings its signature vitality to an extraordinary concert of Bach, Webern, Beethoven, and Mozart.

 

Complementing the Budapest Festival Orchestra’s staged performance of Verdi’s comedy, this summer’s film screenings in the Walter Reade Theater lend fuller perspective to the lovable rogue Sir John Falstaff, one of Shakespeare’s most enduring characters. The screenings include The Hollow Crown: Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, and Orson Welles’s Chimes at Midnight.

 

The intrepid International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) celebrates its tenth year as festival artists-in-residence, and thirteenth consecutive summer at the festival, staging the North American premiere of a mesmerizing and immersive new chamber opera by the inventive Icelandic composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir. Entitled UR_, it explores humanity’s relationship to the earth, our origins, and our future. They also present a free concert, celebrating the multimodal musical language of Anthony Braxton, in honor of the composer’s 75th birthday.

 

The popular “A Little Night Music” series of late-night performances in the Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse features established and emerging artists in intimate recitals, many with thematic links to concerts earlier in the evening, and across the festival, creating evening-long experiences that expand on a continuous musical thread. The New York Festival of Song, with Artistic Director Steven Blier and singers Lucia Bradford and Miles Mykkanen, will perform a bespoke evening of music by Tony Award®-winning composer Jeanine Tesori and composers who inspired her, as a prelude to performances of her new opera Blue the following evening. Beatrice Rana, Emanuel Ax, Stephen Hough, Jeremy Denk, and the Danish String Quartet will all perform late-night recitals following their performances on larger stages earlier in the evening. And the invigorating Junction Trio offers an otherworldly performance of Beethoven infused with John Zorn.

 

American Express is delighted to support this summer's ambitious programming at Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival, which features groundbreaking and immersive works across art forms, and reflects the community spirit of New York,” said Timothy J. McClimon, President, American Express Foundation. “This relationship is part of our continued commitment to both supporting and preserving the arts and live performance for generations to come.”

 

Summer at Lincoln Center

 

Summer at Lincoln Center is more than a schedule of events. In these fractious times, when many find it easier to divide than unite, we have never been more resolute in our belief in the arts to help us build empathy, learn more about ourselves and others, reach new levels of understanding, and create community. This Summer at Lincoln Center, New Yorkers of all backgrounds and from all over the city will come together to dance under the stars, engage in illuminating conversations, and immerse themselves in artistic experiences as diverse as the city itself. With an emphasis on participatory events, community-conscious programming, and extending our reach, we will explore this essential role of the arts in our society and the many ways they connect us.

 

Tickets for Lincoln Center Members go on sale April 10, 2020 and to the general public beginning April 14, 2020. To become a Lincoln Center Member, visit support.lincolncenter.org Tickets can be purchased online at MostlyMozartFestival.org, by phone via CenterCharge at 212.721.6500, or by visiting the David Geffen Hall or Alice Tully Hall Box Offices.

 

Artist biographies and images are available for download here.

 

 

CHRONOLOGICAL FESTIVAL LISTING

 

 

SPECIAL OPENING-NIGHT PRESENTATION

Divine Connection (World premiere)

A staging of Mozart’s Requiem and works by Arvo Pärt

Tuesday, July 14, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Wednesday, July 15, 2020 at 7:30 pm

David Geffen Hall

Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra
Louis Langrée, conductor
Sunhae Im, soprano
Daniela Mack, mezzo-soprano
Matthew Swensen, tenor (MMF debut)
Ryan Speedo Green, bass-baritone
The Choir of Trinity Wall Street

Julian Wachner, choral director
Elkhanah Pulitzer, director
Chanel DaSilva, choreographer

Pre-concert talk with Elkhanah Pulitzer and Matthew Swanson on Wednesday, July 15 at 6:15 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse

 

Mozart’s eternal Requiem is seamlessly interwoven with timeless music by Arvo Pärt in the world premiere of a groundbreaking Lincoln Center commission directed by Elkhanah Pulitzer and choreographed by Chanel DeSilva. Pärt’s elegiac “Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten” opens the door to an uplifting experience that moves from the almost imperceptible sound of inward grief to an all-encompassing communal embrace of transcendence, illumination, and possibility, using only the movements of the Requiem penned by Mozart himself as its core and Pärt’s ethereal, austere Te Deum. “This is a story about a community, not an individual,” said director Elkhanah Pulitzer. “It is a melting pot of all kinds, there’s room for everyone. It is a journey of grieving and healing, evoking rituals, ultimately seeking a sense of hope.”

 

Commissioned by Lincoln Center

 

 

 

FREE CONCERT

Mostly Mozart Wind Octet
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 at 7:30 pm

David Rubenstein Atrium
Members of the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra
All-Mozart Program
Overture to Don Giovanni, K. 527 (arranged for wind octet)
Wind Serenade in C minor, K.388

A wind ensemble—known in Mozart’s time as a Harmonie—of Festival Orchestra members presents an intimate, free performance of Harmoniemusik, including the Don Giovanni Overture and an absorbing C-minor Serenade, in the David Rubenstein Atrium.

 

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Linz Symphony

Friday, July 17, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Saturday, July 18, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Alice Tully Hall
Andrew Manze, conductor
Martin Helmchen, piano
Webern: Symphony, Op. 21
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat major, K. 482
Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major, K.425 (“Linz”)

Pre-concert recitals by Martin Helmchen, piano, at 6:30 pm in Alice Tully Hall
Bach: Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826

 

Andrew Manze returns for an engaging concert experience with the Festival Orchestra full of charm, wit, and joyous music-making, in Alice Tully Hall. On the program are Mozart’s resplendent “Linz” Symphony and the Piano Concerto No. 22, featuring soloist Martin Helmchen, as well as Webern’s Symphony in a rare performance of twelve-tone serial music at the Mostly Mozart Festival.

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Bach, Berg, and Brahms

Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David Geffen Hall
Louis Langrée, conductor
Augustin Hadelich, violin
Lauren Snouffer, soprano (MMF debut)
Eric Jurenas, countertenor (MMF debut)
Colin Balzer, tenor (MMF debut)
Tyler Duncan, baritone (MMF debut)
Bach: Nach dir, Herr, verlanget mich, Cantata BWV 150
Berg: Violin Concerto
Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E minor, Op. 98

 

Pre-concert talks with Louis Langrée and Augustin Hadelich at 6:30 pm
David Geffen Hall

 

Both Johannes Brahms and Alban Berg drew profound inspiration from Bach, whose achingly beautiful cantata “Nach dir, Herr, verlanget mich,” sets the tone for this program, an exquisite synthesis of heart and mind. Brahms, who spent countless hours studying Bach’s scores, adapted the chaconne from this very cantata to form the passacaglia in the last movement of his Symphony No. 4, presented as the culmination of Langrée’s survey of the Brahms Symphonies. Berg’s heart-wrenching Violin Concerto, dedicated “to the memory of an angel” and featuring Augustin Hadelich, deconstructs and rebuilds Bach’s chorale, “Es ist genug” from Cantata 60.

 

DANCE
L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato

Mark Morris Dance Group

Wednesday, July 22, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Thursday, July 23, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Friday, July 24, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David H. Koch Theater
Mark Morris, choreographer
Jane Glover, conductor
Yulia Van Doren, soprano
Sarah Brailey, soprano (MMF debut)

Robin Tritschler, tenor
Douglas Williams, baritone
MMDG Music Ensemble
The Choir of Trinity Wall Street with Downtown Voices
Julian Wachner, choral director
Adrianne Lobel, set design
Christine Van Loon, costume design
James F. Ingalls, lighting design
Handel: L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato, HWV 55

 

Mark Morris, the “Mozart of modern dance” (The Washington Post), returns to Lincoln Center with his beloved masterpiece L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato. A marriage of soaring Handel music and life-affirming dance, the work refers to ways of living and dancing at once: mirthful, melancholy, and in moderation. An exquisite fusion of Baroque songcraft and Morris’s famously musical choreographic ethos, the celebrated choreographer’s humanist, spiritual vision evokes a sublime, timelessly relevant world. Handel expert Jane Glover—a long-time collaborator of Morris—leads soloists, The Choir of Trinity Wall Street with Downtown Voices, and the MMDG Music Ensemble. The supreme expression of late 20th-century American modern dance. … Utopia, in Morris's hands, is a house of many rooms.” (The Guardian)

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

Endowment support for the Mostly Mozart Festival presentation of Mark Morris Dance Group is provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance.

 

 

RELATED EVENT
Dance with Mark Morris Dance Group

Wednesday, July 22, 2020 from 6:00 to 7:00 pm
Hearst Plaza

 

Learn to dance with one of the world’s most celebrated dance companies. For this special all-ages, all-abilities class, participants will have the chance to learn dances from Mark Morris’s L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato. Also a part of Lincoln Center Out of Doors.

 

 

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Vienna to New York

Friday, July 24, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David Geffen Hall
Joshua Weilerstein, conductor (MMF debut)
Beatrice Rana, piano
Haydn: Symphony No. 1 in D major
Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, Op. 19
HK Gruber: Manhattan Broadcasts (New York premiere)
Mozart: Symphony No. 35 in D major, K.385 (“Haffner”)

 

Pre-concert recitals by Michael Brown, piano, at 6:30 pm in David Geffen Hall
Haydn: Capriccio, from Fantasia in C Major, Hob. XVII, No. 4
Debussy: Hommage à Haydn
Ravel: Menuet sur le nom d’Haydn
Mozart: Fantasia in C minor, K. 475

 

Conductor Joshua Weilerstein makes his Festival debut with the supreme triumvirate of the First Viennese School, complemented by a New York premiere from Austrian composer HK Gruber—fittingly inspired by Manhattan and replete with bongos, vibraphone, and electric guitar. Pianist Beatrice Rana, who made a blazing New York debut in the 2017 Mostly Mozart Festival, returns for Beethoven’s B-flat major Piano Concerto.

 

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

New York Festival of Song

Friday, July 24, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Steven Blier, piano
Lucia Bradford, mezzo-soprano (MMF debut)
Miles Mykkanen, tenor
Music of Jeanine Tesori and others

 

The evening prior to the Mostly Mozart Festival performances of Jeanine Tesori and Tazewell Thompson’s new opera Blue, the New York Festival of Song performs the music of Tony Award®-winner Tesori, whose 25-year Broadway career has included the hit shows Thoroughly Modern Millie, Shrek, and Fun Home. Pianist and host Steven Blier is joined by mezzo-soprano Lucia Bradford and tenor Miles Mykkanen in an evening of Tesori’s most celebrated works including selections from her musicals Caroline, or Change; Violet; and Thoroughly Modern Millie, and her operas A Blizzard on Marblehead Neck and The Lion, the Unicorn, and Me. The program is complemented by songs by composers who inspired her, including Stephen Sondheim, William Bolcom, and Kurt Weill.

 

 

 

FILM

The Hollow Crown: Henry IV, Part 1
Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 12:30 pm
Walter Reade Theater
Directed by Richard Eyre
Starring Jeremy Irons, Tom Hiddleston, and Simon Russell Beale as Falstaff
(2012) 120 minutes

 

First broadcast on BBC and PBS in 2012, this movie version of Shakespeare’s tragicomic meditation on fathers and sons, nations and rulers, is an exemplary translation from stage to screen. The initial cycle of filmed history plays that make up the limited series The Hollow Crown, the first part of Henry IV focuses on the civil unrest under the title monarch (Jeremy Irons) and the comical misadventures of his hard-partying, irreverent son, Prince Hal (Tom Hiddleston). Rounding out the principal roles is Sir John Falstaff (Simon Russell Beale), Hal’s rotund, loquacious, aged, and hugely entertaining companion. Both teacher and student, father-figure and subject, Falstaff forges an intense but doomed love with the coolly calculating Hal. Richard Eyre’s masterfully staged and shot production (maintaining the late-medieval period) navigates the vocabulary of theater and cinema with nimble ease.

 

 

 

OPERA
Blue (New York City premiere)

A new opera by Jeanine Tesori and Tazewell Thompson
Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Sunday, July 26, 2020 at 5:00 pm
Monday, July 27, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Rose Theater, Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall

Jeanine Tesori, composer
Tazewell Thompson, librettist and director (MMF debut)

Orchestra of St. Luke's
Carolyn Kuan, conductor
Kenneth Kellogg, The Father
Briana Hunter, The Mother
Aaron Crouch, The Son
Gordon Hawkins, The Reverend

Ariana Wehr, Girlfriend 1
Brea R. Marshall, Girlfriend 2
Camron Gray, Police Officer Buddy 1
Edward Graves, Police Officer Buddy 2
Nicholas Davis, Police Officer Buddy 3
Donald Eastman, set designer
Jessica Jahn, costume designer
Robert Wierzel, lighting designer

 

Pre-performance panel discussion with Jeanine Tesori, Tazewell Thompson, and others
on Saturday, July 25 from 4:00 to 5:30 pm
Varis Leichtman Studio at Jazz at Lincoln Center

 

Post-performance discussion with Jeanine Tesori and Tazewell Thompson on Sunday, July 26

 

Post-performance discussion with members of the cast on Monday, July 27

 

An African American couple in Harlem anticipates the birth of their firstborn, a son, with both hope and fear. As the baby grows into a young man, the mother worries for his future, and the father tries to prepare his son for the realities of 21st-century America, while wrestling with his own identity as a police officer—a “Black man in blue.” When their deepest fears come true, the family is forced to navigate a devastating reality, and seeks answers and support from their loving community of fellow law enforcement, churchgoers, and friends. Gospel-influenced music and tender realism capture the grief of a family and community navigating the turbulent waters of loss at the hands of police. Exploring race, violence, and reconciliation Blue places timely issues at the forefront of modern opera and invites audiences to the emotional epicenter of their impact. Blue’s vibrant libretto is by international opera and theater director, Tazewell Thompson, and the soaring score is by the acclaimed Tony Award®-winning Jeanine Tesori, whose work spans musical forms from opera (A Blizzard on Marblehead Neck and Grounded, a new Metropolitan Opera commission) to Broadway (Fun Home and Caroline, or Change).

 

A series of companion events with partners from across the New York City area will be presented alongside Blue, to engage communities and foster discussion about a variety of topics and issues presented in the opera. Additional information to be announced in the coming weeks.

 

Blue was commissioned by The Glimmerglass Festival and premiered in July 2019.

 

The scenery and costumes were originally created for a co-production with The Glimmerglass Festival, Washington National Opera, and Lyric Opera of Chicago.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Beatrice Rana

Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Schumann: Piano Sonata No. 3, Op. 14
Stravinsky: Three Movements from Petrushka

 

Beatrice Rana, an artist whose virtuosity is centered, focused, and deliberate, follows her performance of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in David Geffen Hall with a late-night recital featuring two showpieces for a spellbinding evening: Schumann’s Piano Sonata No. 3, nicknamed the “Concerto Without Orchestra” and Stravinsky’s fiendishly difficult Petrushka.

 

 

FILM

The Hollow Crown: Henry IV, Part 2
Sunday, July 26, 2020 at 12:30 pm
Walter Reade Theater
Directed by Richard Eyre
Starring Jeremy Irons, Tom Hiddleston, and Simon Russell Beale as Falstaff
(2012) 121 minutes

 

The second part of Henry IV follows the up-and-down fortunes of the roguish knight Sir John Falstaff (Simon Russell Beale) and those of his drinking buddy, the increasingly duty-bound Prince Hal (Tom Hiddleston). Mixing low comedy and piercing melancholy, Part 2 abounds in beautiful speeches and startling developments—the death of Hal’s father, more civil unrest, and the new monarch’s Oedipal rejection of Falstaff. For lovers of Shakespeare on film, Beale’s magnificent Falstaff—directed by five-time Olivier Award-winner Richard Eyre—is a thing of beauty. Beale balances Falstaff’s traditional bombast and slapstick with an aching sense of mortality.

 

 

 

MUSIC ON PERIOD INSTRUMENTS

Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Sunday, July 26, 2020 at 3:00 pm
Alice Tully Hall
Kristian Bezuidenhout, fortepiano
Isabelle Faust, violin
Gottfried von der Goltz, concertmaster
All-Beethoven Program:
Overture to The Creatures of Prometheus, Op. 43
Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37
Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61

 

Pre-concert recital by Isabelle Faust, violin and Kristian Bezuidenhout, fortepiano
at 2:00 pm in Alice Tully Hall
Mozart: Sonata in G major, K. 379

 

Two elegant virtuosos perform Beethoven masterworks in his 250th birth year, with the inimitable Freiburg Baroque Orchestra. Artistic director Kristian Bezuidenhout performs the bold Concerto No. 3 in C minor alongside his period-instrument orchestra, and violinist Isabelle Faust imbues her indomitable spirit into Beethoven’s iconoclastic Violin Concerto. The popular overture to The Creatures of Prometheus, Beethoven’s only full-length ballet, opens the program.

 

 

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Mozart Meets Mendelssohn

Tuesday, July 28, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David Geffen Hall
Rafael Payare, conductor (New York debut)
Emanuel Ax, piano
Mozart: Overture to La clemenza di Tito, K. 621
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat major, K. 271
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op. 56 (“Scottish”)

 

Pre-concert recitals by Stella Chen, violin at 6:30 pm in David Geffen Hall
Brahms/Schumann/Dietrich: F-A-E Sonata

 

Venezuelan conductor and Music Director of San Diego Symphony, Rafael Payare makes his New York debut in a soaring program of Mozart and Mendelssohn. Mozart’s brilliant and festive overture to La clemenza di Tito opens the door to his inventive “Jenamy” Concerto filled with operatic touches and Baroque concerto elements and featuring pianist Emanuel Ax. The program concludes with the evocative “Scottish” Symphony by Mendelssohn, who was considered by many as the “Second Mozart.”

 

 

DANCE

Flowers for Kazuo Ohno (and Leonard Cohen) (New York premiere)

Wednesday, July 29, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Thursday, July 30, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Friday, July 31, 2020 at 7:30 pm

Gerald W. Lynch Theater

Compañía Cuerpo de Indias

Conceived and Directed by Álvaro Restrepo

Marie France Delieuvin, Ricardo Bustamante, Álvaro Restrepo, choreographers

All songs by Leonard Cohen (except Goodbye Stranger, composed and sung by Sharon Robinson)

Alexander Gümbel, lighting design

El Colegio del Cuerpo, set, props, and costume design

Buddha’s wire heads: Ricardo Castillo

 

Pre-performance talk with Álvaro Restrepo on Thursday, July 30 from 6:15 to 7:00pm
John Jay Lecture Hall

 

Inspired by a momentous, though brief, meeting between the directors of Colombian dance troupe Compañía Cuerpo de Indias and Kazuo Ohno, late father of the Japanese dance-theater form Butoh, this transcultural tribute is set to some of Leonard Cohen’s most transformative songs. Inspired by Ohno’s passionate, subtle movement vocabulary as reimagined in a modern choreographic framework, creators Álvaro Restrepo, Marie France Delieuvin, and Ricardo Bustamante’s shifting tableaux for 11 dancers evoke a sense of mystery and wonder found in both Ohno and Cohen’s astounding bodies of work.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

 

 

FREE PERFORMANCE

International Contemporary Ensemble

Wednesday, July 29, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David Rubenstein Atrium
All-Anthony Braxton Program

Language Music

Ghost Trance Music

 

In Anthony Braxton’s experimental works, performers use written scores, improvisation and conducting to create complex musical collages which grow and develop in real time. To celebrate the composer’s 75th birthday, the adventurous International Contemporary Ensemble presents Braxton’s Language Music and Ghost Trance Music, the former which has now become Braxton’s signature system of conducted improvisation, the latter representing a body of open works that challenges traditional roles of composer, score, and performer.

 

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Pamela Frank, violin
Emanuel Ax, piano
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Mozart: Violin Sonata in G major, K.379
Beethoven: Violin Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 96

 

A longtime friend of the Festival, the eminent Emanuel Ax caps off his performance of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 9 with the Festival Orchestra earlier in the evening with an intimate, late-night program of sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven with frequent recital partner Pamela Frank.

 

 

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Beethoven’s “Emperor”

Friday, July 31, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David Geffen Hall
Richard Egarr, conductor
Stephen Hough, piano
All-Beethoven Program
Overture to Coriolan, Op. 62
Symphony No. 8 in F major, Op. 93
Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 73 (“Emperor”)

 

Pre-concert recitals by Gabriel Martins, cello, at 6:30 pm in David Geffen Hall

Beethoven: Twelve Variations in F Major on Mozart’s “Ein Mädchen oder Weibchen,” Op. 66

 

Beethoven: Seven Variations in E-flat Major on Mozart’s “Bei Männern, welche Liebe fühlen,” WoO 46

 

Guest conductor Richard Egarr and the Festival Orchestra showcase Beethoven’s fierce determination and individualism for the composer’s 250th birthday. The dramatic Coriolan Overture sets up the vibrant, driving energy of the Eighth Symphony. Pianist Stephen Hough, the first classical musician to win a MacArthur “Genius Grant,” performs Beethoven’s final piano concerto, the noble and majestic “Emperor.”

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Stephen Hough, piano
Dover Quartet (MMF debut)
Friday, July 31, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Brahms: Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34

 

Following his performance of the “Emperor” concerto, pianist Stephen Hough is joined by the audacious Dover Quartet for Brahms’s beloved Piano Quintet, often called thecrown of his chamber music.”

 

 

 

PANEL

“Vienna, City of Music”
Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 4:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Moderated by Bruce Alan Brown

Presented in association with the Mozart Society of America

 

A lively panel of scholars from the Mozart Society of America explores Vienna on the cusp of the 19th century, when the Enlightenment was giving way to Romanticism and Beethoven was poised to inherit the mantle of Haydn and Mozart.

 

 

 

OPERA

Falstaff (U.S. production premiere)

Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Monday, August 3, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Rose Theater
Budapest Festival Orchestra
Iván Fischer, conductor
Nicola Alaimo, Falstaff (MMF debut)
Eva Mei, Alice (MMF debut)
Tassis Christoyannis, Ford
Yvonne Naef, Mistress Quickly (MMF debut)
Laura Polverelli, Meg Page (MMF debut)
Sylvia Schwartz, Nanetta (MMF debut)
Xabier Anduaga, Fenton (MMF debut)
Carlo Bosi, Dr. Caius (MMF debut)
Stuart Patterson, Bardolfo (MMF debut)
Giovanni Battista Parodi, Pistola (MMF debut)
Iván Fischer and Marco Gandini, directors

Andrea Tocchio, scenic design and assistant director
Anna Biagiotti, costume design
Tamás Bányai, lighting design

 

Iván Fischer leads ten singers and the Budapest Festival Orchestra in the U.S. production premiere of one of his ingenious staged spectacles, brilliantly blurring the line between concert and theater. Verdi’s exuberant final opera about the roguish knight Sir John Falstaff is brought to life in an uproarious performance where musicians double as fairies, and even the conductor participates in the action.

 

 

FILM

Chimes at Midnight
Sunday, August 2, 2020 at 12:30 pm
Walter Reade Theater
Directed by Orson Welles
Starring Orson Welles as Falstaff, with Jeanne Moreau, Margaret Rutherford, and John Gielgud
(1965) 119 minutes

 

“Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world!” So goes Sir John Falstaff’s exuberant self-defense in the face of his friend—and ultimate betrayer—Prince Hal. The line is especially poignant coming as it does from director and star Orson Welles, whom all moviedom seemed to reject after his early masterpieces. The portly, bass-voiced Welles was born to play Falstaff—hilarious, tyrannical, and moody by turns. British stage royalty John Gielgud lends gravitas as the troubled Henry IV. And the filmmaking, in a beautifully restored critical edition, shows Welles at his most incandescent. The furious Battle of Shrewsbury is a technical marvel of editing, musical in its mayhem.

 

 

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Beethoven’s Triple Concerto

Tuesday, August 4, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 at 7:30 pm
David Geffen Hall
Louis Langrée, conductor
Joshua Bell, violin
Steven Isserlis, cello
Jeremy Denk, piano
Haydn: Overture to L’isola disabitata, Hob. XXVIII No. 9
Mozart: Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K.550
Beethoven: Triple Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C major, Op. 56

 

Pre-concert recitals at 6:30 pm in David Geffen Hall

 

Louis Langrée leads the Festival Orchestra in a quintessential Mostly Mozart program, complete with drama and enlightenment. The sturm und drang of Haydn’s Overture to L’isola disabitata sets the mood for Mozart’s Symphony No. 40, both of which Langrée conducted for his 1998 New York debut at the Mostly Mozart Festival. Violinist Joshua Bell, pianist Jeremy Denk, and cellist Steven Isserlis—virtuosic soloists, dynamic collaborators, and longtime friends—join forces for the Beethoven Triple Concerto, a joyous piece that holds the camaraderie of chamber music in the form of a concerto grosso.

 

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Junction Trio (MMF debut)
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Christopher Trapani: Passing Through, Staying Put (2011)
Beethoven: Piano Trio in D major, Op. 70, No. 1 (“Ghost”)
John Zorn: Ghosts (2015)

 

The electrifying Junction Trio, consisting of three recipients of the Avery Fisher Career Grant, pianist Conrad Tao, violinist Stefan Jackiw, and cellist Jay Campbell, crafts a compelling program as a finale to the Beethoven Triple Concerto—featuring another all-star trio—earlier that evening. Christopher Trapani’s “Passing Through, Staying Put” explores movement and stasis and sets the stage for an eerie interweaving of Beethoven’s “Ghost” Trio with John Zorn’s otherworldy “Ghosts,” a piece loosely inspired by the movement that gave Beethoven’s Trio its nickname.

 

 

 

CHAMBER OPERA

UR_ (North American premiere)
A chamber opera by Anna Thorvaldsdottir
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Friday, August 7, 2020 at 7:30 pm
The DiMenna Center for Classical Music

International Contemporary Ensemble
Daniela Candillari, conductor
Alice Teyssier, Sofia Jernberg, Michael Weyandt, voice
Multimedia sound sculpture by Anna Thorvaldsdottir, Nick Houfek, Levy Lorenzo,
Maciej Lewandowski, and Ross Karre
Cory Smythe, piano
Robert Castro, director
Nicholas Houfek, lighting design
Levy Lorenzo, sound design
Ross Karre, video and supertitles
Narrative by Anna Thorvaldsdottir
Words and phonetic textures by Anna Thorvaldsdottir
Title and additional text by Mette Karlsvik

Anna Thorvaldsdottir: UR_

 

Pre-performance talk with Anna Thorvaldsdottir on Thursday, August 6 from 6:15 to 7:00 pm
Jerome Robbins Theater

 

The intrepid International Contemporary Ensemble presents the North American premiere of Thorvaldsdottir’s chamber opera, in which a trilogy of lost voices struggles to find its way back to its natural origin—the UR_—to mother Earth and to nature. Portrayed by a mezzo-soprano, an experimental vocalist, and a baritone, the trilogy looks to a central being (a light and sound sculpture which extends from floor to ceiling at the center of the room) for a way to navigate intangibility, insignificance, and the fractured relationship to its origin. The production affords a truly immersive experience, with the audience and performers sharing the same physical space, to foster a communal understanding of the UR_. No two listeners experience exactly the same thing, inviting each audience member to form their own understanding of our relationship with the earth.

 

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Jeremy Denk, piano
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Stucky: Sonata for Piano
Frederic Rzewski: Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues (1980)
Beethoven: Sonata No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111

 

Pianist Jeremy Denk takes center stage in this late-night recital following his joint performance of the Beethoven Triple Concerto with the Festival Orchestra, pairing Beethoven’s rapturous final piano sonata with two contemporary American works. The Sonata for Piano by Steven Stucky, with whom Denk worked for the opera The Classical Style: An Opera (of Sorts), paves the way for Frederic Rzewski’s protest song about the plight of the industrial worker, complete with the chugging sounds of the mill that eventually overwhelm the gentle ragtime workers’ song.

 

 

CHAMBER MUSIC

Danish String Quartet
Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 7:30 pm
Alice Tully Hall
Bach: Contrapunctus XIV, from Art of Fugue
Webern: String Quartet
Beethoven: String Quartet in C minor, Op. 18, No. 4
Mozart: String Quartet in E-flat major, K.428

 

The Danish String Quartet, named Musical America’s 2020 Ensemble of the Year, brings its supercharged energy to beloved chamber works by Bach, Beethoven, and Mozart paired with Webern’s groundbreaking string quartet.

 

 

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

Danish String Quartet
Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 10:00 pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse
Folk music from Nordic countries

 

The Danish String Quartet channels ancestral fiddlers and celebrates its Nordic roots in this transporting after-hours concert of rousing folk songs, following their performance in Alice Tully Hall.

 

 

 

CHORAL WORK

Search for Spring (World premiere)
A crowd action
Saturday, August 8, 2020 at 11:30 am
Josie Robertson Plaza
Rain location: David Geffen Hall
Jonathan Dove, composer
Alasdair Middleton, librettist
Simon Halsey, conductor
Annette Jolles, director

There will be a related discussion with Jonathan Dove and Simon Halsey, moderated by John Schaefer,
on Friday, August 7 from 6:15 to 7:00pm
Stanley H. Kaplan Penthouse

 

Continuing its tradition of presenting communal, outdoor, immersive musical experiences, Lincoln Center has commissioned composer Jonathan Dove and librettist Alasdair Middleton to create a monumental, community-driven choral work. Staged on the iconic Josie Robertson Plaza, 1,000 experienced and amateur singers from across New York City sing as a community seeking a way forward in challenging times. “People gather after the disappearance of Spring,” said Dove. “There are questions, accusations, and recriminations, leading to a collective outpouring of loss—the only thing on which the crowd is unanimous. Finally a new voice is heard.” Simon Halsey, who led the performances of the public domain and In the Name of the Earth, returns to the festival to conduct this participatory work, that is also part of Lincoln Center Out of Doors.

 

Commissioned by Lincoln Center

 

 

 

MOSTLY MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

A Beethoven Odyssey: The 1808 Akademie Concert

Saturday, August 8, 2020 at 4:00 pm and 8:00 pm
David Geffen Hall
Louis Langrée, conductor
Kirill Gerstein, piano
Susanna Phillips, soprano
Lauren Michelle, soprano (MMF debut)
Tamara Mumford, mezzo-soprano (MMF debut)
Thomas Cooley, tenor
Miles Mykkanen, tenor
Dashon Burton, bass-baritone (MMF debut)
Concert Chorale of New York
James Bagwell, choral director
Young People’s Chorus of New York City
Francisco J. Núñez, artistic director/founder

 

PART 1:

Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 (“Pastoral”)
Ah! perfido, Op. 65
Gloria from Mass in C major, Op. 86
Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58 

 

PART 2:

Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67
Sanctus and Benedictus from Mass in C major, Op. 86
Improvised Fantasia for solo piano
Fantasia for piano, chorus, and orchestra, Op. 80 (“Choral Fantasy”)

 

The 2020 Mostly Mozart Festival concludes with an epic recreation of Beethoven’s legendary 1808 Akademie, the most important concert in his lifetime. Beethoven called the event an Akademie, which he organized on his own and performed in as piano soloist. The program illustrated his mastery as a composer and the breadth of his skills—with symphonic, sacred, and theatrical works in one evening—as well as his virtuosity at the keyboard, and featured the world premieres of some of his most iconic works, including his Fifth and Sixth Symphonies, and the “Choral Fantasy,” as well as the first public performance of the Fourth Piano Concerto. As he was nearly deaf at the time, the famed concert would be Beethoven’s last public performance as a concert pianist, playing the “Choral Fantasy,” Fourth Piano Concerto and a Fantasia Beethoven improvised in the moment. The program also showcased three movements from his Mass in C and the dramatic concert aria “Ah! perfido.” The collection of works demonstrated Beethoven’s humanistic message and the French ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity he embraced. In this closing event of this summer’s festival, extraordinary pianist Kirill Gerstein joins Louis Langrée and the Festival Orchestra as soloist in the concerto and “Choral Fantasy,” and will extemporize his own Fantasia in the style of Beethoven. Soprano Susanna Phillips, who made her Mostly Mozart Festival debut singing on this very program in 2007, sings Beethoven’s dramatic concert aria “Ah! perfido.” The Concert Chorale of New York, the Young People’s Chorus of New York City, and additional distinguished vocal soloists join to recreate and relive history in this fitting tribute to the 250th anniversary of Beethoven’s birth.

 

***

 

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (LCPA) serves three primary roles: presenter of artistic programming, national leader in arts and education and community engagement, and manager of the Lincoln Center campus. A presenter of thousands of free and ticketed events, performances, tours, and educational activities annually, LCPA offers a variety of festivals and programs, including American Songbook, Avery Fisher Career Grants and Artist program, David Rubenstein Atrium programming, Great Performers, Lincoln Center Emerging Artist Awards, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Lincoln Center Vera List Art Project, LC Kids, Midsummer Night Swing, Mostly Mozart Festival, White Light Festival, the Emmy Award–winning Live From Lincoln Center, which airs nationally on PBS, and Lincoln Center Education, which is celebrating more than four decades enriching the lives of students, educators, and lifelong learners. As manager of the Lincoln Center campus, LCPA provides support and services for the Lincoln Center complex and the 11 resident organizations: The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Film at Lincoln Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, The Juilliard School, Lincoln Center Theater, The Metropolitan Opera, New York City Ballet, New York Philharmonic, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, School of American Ballet, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

 

Lincoln Center is committed to providing and improving accessibility for people with disabilities. For information, contact Accessibility at Lincoln Center at [email protected] or 212.875.5375.

 

***

 

American Express continues its longstanding support of Lincoln Center and the arts in New York City as the lead sponsor of the Mostly Mozart Festival.

 

Major endowment support for contemporary dance and theater is provided by the

Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

 

Additional endowment support is provided by the Blavatnik Family Foundation Fund for Dance,

Nancy Abeles Marks and Jennie L. and Richard K. DeScherer.

 

The Mostly Mozart Festival is also made possible by Rita E. and Gustave M. Hauser.

Additional support is provided by The Shubert Foundation, LuEsther T. Mertz Charitable Trust,

Howard Gilman Foundation, The Fan Fox and Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, Inc.,

The Katzenberger Foundation, Inc., Mitsui & Co. (U.S.A.), Inc.,

Great Performers Circle, Lincoln Center Patrons,

Friends of Mostly Mozart, and Lincoln Center Members.

 

Public support is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 

“Summer at Lincoln Center” is supported by PEPSICO.

 

Artist catering provided by Zabar’s and Zabars.com

 

FOLLOW LINCOLN CENTER ON SOCIAL MEDIA:

Facebook: facebook.com/LincolnCenterNYC

Twitter: @LincolnCenter #MostlyMozart

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For more information, please contact:

Jenni Klauder

[email protected]

212-875-5490

 

Michelle Tabnick

[email protected]

646-765-4773

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